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  • I suspect most of us own a battery bank. It feels like device battery life is generally getting better, particularly in standby, but also we're using them more and with the odd exception (*cough* Lenovo P2 *cough*) batteries aren't really getting bigger. Having a backup option in your bag always feels sensible. So how do you choose which battery bank to buy? Getting the right one for you can be surprisingly complicated given the options available. So we'll help you choose!


    EMUI, aka Emotion UI - the custom UI layer for Android that features on Honor and Huawei devices - has always taken a lot of criticism. Of course, this is true for all manufacturer software versions that aren't 'stock Android', but EMUI has previously been particularly 'heavy', which means it taken more flak. One key criticism was the battery optimisations that used to lead to missing notifications. Thankfully, this isn't the case nowadays - we'll take you through what EMUI does include on the battery front and how to manage it.


    It might feel like Android tablets are dead (on the whole, it's hard to argue, let's be honest), but there are still some pretty compelling devices out there. One of my personal favourite tablets is the Samsung Tab S2 8.0, which I have in Qualcomm / LTE flavour. It's great, but unlike the Tab S3 (which unfortunately is only available in the larger size) it doesn't have any specific stylus support. So, as a big fan of previous Adonit stylii, I jumped at the chance to try the new 'Droid' model.


    Android has a feature known as 'FRP', or 'Factory Reset Protection'. This is designed to prevent someone stealing your phone, performing a factory reset, then selling it on. If you don't do things in the right way however, this can also trip you up when selling your device. Follow our guidance to avoid this happening to you!


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    • Just received a 2nd hand Hudl 2 - performed a factory reset as a first step, now I can't proceed through the initial setup. It connects via wifi fine, but then cannot find the internet connection to proceed. If I access chrome through the keyboard settings, I can verify that it is in fact connected to the internet, it's just the tesco initial setup wizard that thinks internet not present. Tried multiple networks, multiple factor resets, hard resets, etc. etc.   Any advice would be great - can I try reflashing the original tesco firmward, or custom firmware or somthing? Would prefer not to but appears maybe the only route back from useless paperweight status...   Thanks very much for any advice!
    • To make this post a proper guide and not just an advert for the ioutdoor x which it currently is, please provide links to the other devices and images and provide the same specification details.   Thank you
    • Construction sites are dangerous places for smartphones, unless you pick the best and most durable model.  Based on the number of smartphones you see with spiderweb-cracked screens, you might think every model out there was an expensive and fragile waste of money, particularly if you're active on a jobsite. Drops and bumps, water sprays, dust, extreme temperatures, and vibrations are all threats to an otherwise essential technology tool.   Luckily, not all smartphones are delicate flowers. There are strong options available for construction contractors, engineers and skilled tradespeople who cannot afford to compromise on ruggedness. Whether you need something weatherproof, impact-resistant, optimized for multimedia, ready for collaborative projects or all of the above, you just need to know where to look.     What makes a smartphone rugged?   To call a phone rugged, not to mention waterproof or water-resistant, it should have a variety of certifications to its name. That means a third party has conducted tests to prove whether the device can withstand some pretty serious abuse. There are generally two types of these certifications: IP and MIL-STD.   The IP (Ingress Protection) rating on a smartphone is published by the International Electrotechnical Commission, which determines if a device performs after exposure to dirt, dust and water. The ratings for dirt range from 1 to 6, and 1 to 8 for water. The max rating for particulates would be IP6, and a max rating for liquid would be IP8. That would mean an IP68 phone is completely resistant to dirt damage and can be left underwater indefinitely, at a depth determined by the manufacturer.   The MIL-STD (Military Standard) specs are set by various arms of the U.S. Military and Department of Defense. The numbers associated with MIL-STD indicate far more than just protection from water and dust. For instance, MIL-STD-810Gs certifies that something can withstand nuclear radiation, drops onto concrete, and exposure to rapid freezing or heat. These certifications can be much more nuanced, but most commonly in rugged smartphones, you'll note they are listed under an umbrella designation of MIL-STD-810G, which has a number of subcategories.   It is worth noting that a smartphone lacking one of these certifications may still be able to take a beating. For instance, companies such as Panasonic and Xplore are more focused on making sure their devices can be dropped than they are on them being able to handle really cold weather.     Best rugged smartphones   The ioutdoor x (about 229$ Aliexpress https://bit.ly/2JkqOaq) is IP68 certified to offer protection against dust, shock from a 6-foot fall onto concrete, vibration, temperature extremes, blowing rain, low pressure, solar radiation, salt fog, humidity and water immersion. The Android phone sports a big storage 6GB+128 GB, and 18:9 full screen, NFC, which is is a state-of-the-art smartphone with fashion design suit for daily use.     The Sonim XP7 ($579) is another smartphone to consider for jobsites. It's more 'tank' than entertainment center, and it comes with a three-year, no-questions-asked warranty. Its Gorilla Glass 2 screen doesn't match the Brigadier's for imperviousness, but it runs Android and is IP69 rated.   The Crosscall Trekker-X3 was built to live outside. It is IP67 rated, meaning it can survive a full range of outdoor conditions. It does far more than deliver your email and apps, too. It comes with a built-in thermometer, hygrometer, barometer and magnetometer. The box it comes in doubles as a wireless charger.    
    • Sorry mate forgot to update this I was able to send back so no longer available
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