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    EXCLUSIVE: LG to attack the high-end with Tegra 3 powered P880 / X3 (screenshots!)


    PaulOBrien

    Well, it looks like the HTC Endeavor (or whatever it shall eventually be called) won't be the only device appearing at MWC sporting a Tegra 3 chip... as it will be joined by the LG X3 (internal name P880), LG's new flagship device!

    Our secret source inside LG has been in touch to let us know that the features include...

    • 4.7" HD 720x1280 screen
    • Tegra 3 Quad core processor (1.5GHz on single core, 1.4GHz when on 2-4 cores) + SMP Core (core companion) for IDLE task operations which will save battery life
    • 2000mAh battery
    • 16GB internal memory + microSD slot
    • 8MP camera with ultra fast shutter
    • 1.3MP Front Facing camera
    • Ice Cream Sandwich 4.0.3

    Now, not only has our contact spilled the specs (which confirm what have been posted elsewhere), but they've winged us a couple of screenshots too, which i've posted below (click for full size versions).

    What can we glean from the screenshots? We can see the device is benching at a jaw-dropping 4412 points in 'new Quadrant' and we can see the device is indeed running Android 4.0.3 but with a 2.6.39 kernel, which is the latest release from Nvidia (thanks flibblesan for pointing that out!). The theme in the screenshots looks fairly vanilla, so hopefully LG won't hack about stock Android too much on this one (I know, wishful thinking!)

    I also took the opportunity to prod said contact about the forthcoming Optimus 2X update to ICS and, predictably, it's 'in progress but not ready yet'. LG device buyer beware...?

    If you decide to buy new LG gadget and estimate the quality of recording and reproduction of video on this smartphone by yourself, you may need to convert your videos including HD to the desired format. I recommend free software from Freemake, since it supports the maximum amount of different audio and video formats, and also contains ready presets for a variety of smartphones - from the oldest to the newest flagships. The program runs on Windows, conversion takes a few minutes. The ability to convert YouTube video to mp3 for listening to music on smartphones is included. You can download Freemake video converter here.
     

    Edited by PaulOBrien

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    @unfnknblvbl That's why we have people like Paul making custom mods. LG has always made good hardware but the software side and after release support has always been a major let down.

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    Interesting observation:

    Looks like the Tegra3 GPU doesn't hold up against competition. Observe that a large part of the score is CPU's contribution and the graphics is only slightly better than the SoC on Galaxy Tab and Galaxy Nexus. On the other hand, the Galaxy Tab SoC seems to be weak on CPU while the TI SoC on Galaxy Nexus posts a strong CPU score.

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