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PaulOBrien

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Everything posted by PaulOBrien

  1. So the Honor 8 is upon us and once again, the Huawei sub-brand has delivered a device which is incredibly desirable at an affordable price. Although the phone succeeds the Honor 7, the price has increased this time round to £370, perhaps partly indicative of the currency challenges of Brexit, but certainly a symptom of the elevation of the Honor flagship from wannabe premium to legitimate competitor to the likes of the Galaxy S7. Why would you pay more when you can pick up the Honor 8, the OnePlus 3, the Xiaomi Mi5 or a number of other alternate-brand flagships for under £400? It's a good question and no doubt something Samsung, HTC, Lenovo and co will be considering very seriously. Honor are also famously keen to chop prices in promotional offers (and indeed there's £70 of goodies included in the Honor 8 launch bundle), so the fight is even more aggressive than it first appears. The Honor 4X, 5C, 5X, 6, 6 Plus and 7 have all been updated to Marshmallow in a relatively timely manner and EMUI is definitely heading in the right direction, meaning that updates are in many cases being more forthcoming than those of more 'premium brands'. With the added community engagement of Honor and a growing base of resources for those of us who like to hack or tweak our devices, the reasons for not choosing the Chinese brand are coming down fast. Personally, I'm more than happy to use a Honor as my main device (indeed, I've been using a V8 that I personally imported from China and I'll likely switch full time to the 8 now), so if I can, there aren't a whole lot of reasons for anyone else to hold off. Water resistance? Absolute camera performance? The Galaxy S7 probably has that covered. But it's a whole lot of price premium to get those additional features. I am extremely interested to see how the Honor 8 does in the market over the coming months, particularly through the network deal with Three, and particularly given how well the P9 was received (remember, the Honor 8 bumps the RAM from 3GB to 4GB and the Sapphire Blue model big-time dials up the sexy). What are your thoughts?
  2. So the Honor 8 is upon us and once again, the Huawei sub-brand has delivered a device which is incredibly desirable at an affordable price. Although the phone succeeds the Honor 7, the price has increased this time round to £370, perhaps partly indicative of the currency challenges of Brexit, but certainly a symptom of the elevation of the Honor flagship from wannabe premium to legitimate competitor to the likes of the Galaxy S7. Why would you pay more when you can pick up the Honor 8, the OnePlus 3, the Xiaomi Mi5 or a number of other alternate-brand flagships for under £400? It's a good question and no doubt something Samsung, HTC, Lenovo and co will be considering very seriously. Honor are also famously keen to chop prices in promotional offers (and indeed there's £70 of goodies included in the Honor 8 launch bundle), so the fight is even more aggressive than it first appears. The Honor 4X, 5C, 5X, 6, 6 Plus and 7 have all been updated to Marshmallow in a relatively timely manner and EMUI is definitely heading in the right direction, meaning that updates are in many cases being more forthcoming than those of more 'premium brands'. With the added community engagement of Honor and a growing base of resources for those of us who like to hack or tweak our devices, the reasons for not choosing the Chinese brand are coming down fast. Personally, I'm more than happy to use a Honor as my main device (indeed, I've been using a V8 that I personally imported from China and I'll likely switch full time to the 8 now), so if I can, there aren't a whole lot of reasons for anyone else to hold off. Water resistance? Absolute camera performance? The Galaxy S7 probably has that covered. But it's a whole lot of price premium to get those additional features. I am extremely interested to see how the Honor 8 does in the market over the coming months, particularly through the network deal with Three, and particularly given how well the P9 was received (remember, the Honor 8 bumps the RAM from 3GB to 4GB and the Sapphire Blue model big-time dials up the sexy). What are your thoughts? View full item
  3. When the Honor 5C launched recently, we liaised with Honor UK to ensure that enthusiasts resources would be available immediately on announcement and today, I am pleased to confirm we have done the same with the Honor 8 (FRD-L09). Immediately in the Honor forum, you can access the stock shipping ROM, a fully working TWRP build including decryption (which will be officially supported very soon), the stock ROM template for TWRP, stock Android and EMUI style MoDaCo custom ROMS and guides on how to bootloader and SIM unlock your Honor 8 (we have worked with dc-unlocker to ensure the Honor 8 is fully supported and also virtually unbrickable). A full, tested kernel source repository will be online very soon complete with kernel build instructions. Once again this demonstrates Honor's commitment to enthusiasts, which is great news for all of us. We'll be keeping the resources up to date as the device comes to market and receives updates, but in the meantime, head on over to our Honor 8 forum and have a look around!
  4. Honor have today announced their new flagship device for the UK, the £369.99 Honor 8. Previously announced for the US and China, the UK gets the 4GB / 32GB model, complete with a hybrid slot which means you can either add a microSD card or a second SIM card. The device has a lot in common with the acclaimed Huawei P9, retaining the same dual 12 Megapixel cameras, one of which is colour and the other is monochrome. Due to the lack of Leica co-branding, the device makes do with the 'regular' Huawei range camera app and eschews the native monochrome mode (although it seems likely this can be added back, indeed the Leica app can be flashed and works fine on the Honor 8, albeit still without the monochrome option). An 8 Megapixel camera is on the front of the device. At the heart of the Honor 8 ticks the Kirin 950 processor clocked at 2.3GHz, slightly slower than the 2.5GHz in the P9 but in reality, indistinguishable to the user. With the ample 4GB RAM on board, it's no surprise that this thing is fast. We've been using it for a few weeks now and it's ultra smooth. The device has a metal frame but features glass on both the front and the back. The look and feel of the device is frankly stunning, particularly in the 'Sapphire Blue' colour ('Pearl White' and 'Midnight Black' are also avaiable). As is common on Huawei devices, the fingerprint reader is on the back (and responds as quickly as 0.4 seconds), but this time it also doubles up as a physically clickable button, replacing the smart key on the side of the device's predecessor, the Honor 7. Thanks to the glass, there are no unsightly antenna bands to ruin the look of the device and reception (both cellular and from the dual band wifi) is excellent. NFC support is included this time round which means working Android Pay, a must for a high end device in 2016. Despite the proliferation of 5.5" and bigger devices now, 5.2" is probably the real sweet spot, which is where the Honor 8 sits. The LTPS panel has a 1920x1080 FHD resolution, but unless you are big into VR applications you won't be left wanting, it's a great display, protected with 2.5D glass all round. USB Type C is now well and truly upon us and the 8 is the first UK Honor device to feature the new connector, complete with support for HiSilicon 9V 2A fast charging, although this is not cross compatible with Qualcomm QuickCharge. A 3.5mm connector is still included for headphones of course. A 3000mAh battery looks set to provide the excellent battery life we've come to expect from Honor devices. On the software front, the Honor 8 runs Android Marshmallow with Honor's love-it or hate-it Emotion UI (EMUI). The good news is that with every device release, the skin is slimmed down and that too is the case on the 8. In addition, with so many Google apps being available on the Play Store now, it's much less of an issue than it used to be. MoDaCo will be providing today shipping ROM images for the device, full TWRP support, EMUI and Stock Style custom ROMs as well as guides on making the device appear stock Android and details on how to bootloader and SIM unlock the device if required. As with previous devices, the Honor 8 is very accessible to the keen modder. The Honor 8 will be available from August 24 on Honor’s vMall for £369.99, including an anniversary package worth £69.99 (while stocks last, contents to be confirmed). On Amazon in Europe, the Honor 8 will be bundled with an Amazon Fire TV Stick free of charge (while stocks last), however we understand this won't extend to the UK. Selected online retailers like Clove, Ebuyer and Expansys will also stock the Honor 8 Sim-free along with it being available on contract exclusively at 3 in the next coming weeks.
  5. USB C is both fantastic and annoying. Fantastic, because it's the future and the reversible plug is very welcome, but annoying because your existing microUSB accessories (of which you have many, I am sure) won't work. As more and more USB C devices filter on to the market, both in mobile phones and laptops, we've checked out some of the compatible accessories available from leading brand Choetech. Here's our thoughts on a selection of their offerings, kindly provided by the company. Choetech 39W USB-C Power Adapter - £16.99 The 3 port USB-C power adaptor is true to a trend in a lot of USB C peripherals at the moment - they also support good old USB A. This makes a lot of sense because most of us still have devices that use the old standard. Charging USB C devices is speedy with this adaptor (as it supports 5V 3A), but there's no specific Qualcomm QuickCharge support on either USB C or A. USB C fast charging is a right old mess at the moment, but the protocols for A are better established. The charger is big but not too chunky, feels well made and has smart switching to send power to the right ports. As with all Choetech products, it's nicely packaged with a small user manual included. This is my main charger for behind the bedside table, where I generally have my phone, tablet and kindle! Choetech 55W Multi USB Charging Station - £18.99 If you need something with a bit more oomph, the charging station is very similar to the above, but with 2 extra USB A ports and one extra USB C port - the overall output capability increases as appropriate. The charging block uses a standard figure-of-8 charging cable (which I like, as I have one from Lindy where the plug folds completely flat for travel!) and includes a stand and adhesive pad for putting it up on end. As with the 39W 3 port adapter, there's no QC support but you do get 5V 3A on USB C. A USB C to USB C cable is included in the box. Choetech 33W USB-C Car Charger - £13.99 Moving on to the car, this is is a really cool little thing. Yes, it only has 2 ports, but as well as the 5V 3A USB C port, it has a fully QuickCharge 3.0 compliant USB A port. This is great in our car, where I juice up my Honor V8 on USB C and my other half charges her Galaxy S7 quickly using the USB A port. What the pictures don't do justice is exactly how small this thing is! Despite this it feels nicely made and more premium than many other car chargers I've used. It has a permanent place in our car now! Choetech 2-Pack USB-C to Micro USB Adapter Convert Connector with 56k Resistor - £5.19 For a while now I've carried a microUSB to USB C adaptor on my keyring. I have the OnePlus version, which looks really nice and has a soft polythene sleeve so you can pop the adaptor in and out. I use it lots, mostly with battery banks... but there's a problem. It's officially 'out of spec', which means I don't really know whether it's doing my devices any harm. Not ideal! With the release of these adapters (which I bought on @gavinlew's recommendation), I can bin those and keep the Choetech ones on my keyring. Now, they're not quite as convenient because when you're using them, they either stay on the keyring or you have to unthread them, but it is nice to be safe in the knowledge they're not going to blow up my phone! Choetech USB-C Digital AV Adapter - £31.99 As well as all the phone accessories, I've been testing out a couple of USB C accessories for my so-equipped laptop, a Dell XPS 13. The Digital AV adaptor is particularly useful for me, as the XPS doesn't include a HDMI port! Included in the adaptor is a USB C passthrough with support for power delivery (so you can use it for charging), the HDMI port and a speedy USB 3 port. The silver metal is really co-ordinated to a silver Macbook (and on that device, with its single port, it'd be particularly useful) but it's a staple in my XPS' laptop bag too. Again, it all feels very premium and well made, as it should do for the price (although it compares well to equivalent products). I can't wait until our phones and tablets support this sort of device. Choetech Aluminium 4 Port USB3.0 HUB - £11.99 Finally comes the 4 port hub. Again, this is a particularly useful accessory for a Macbook, offering 4 USB A 3.0 ports and a USB C to A cable in the box for connecting it to your machine. The look is very similar to the Digital AV Adapter, with soft touch aluminium and a really quality finish. I kinda wish a A-A cable was included in the box too, so I could use the hub with my iMac! What's missing? The one USB C peripheral I really want at the moment (but nobody seems to make) is a battery bank with a USB C cable built in. Everybody makes them with microUSB or Lightning cables built in, but not USB C. I don't like having to carry a cable around with my battery bank... so I hope that appears soon! View full item
  6. USB C is both fantastic and annoying. Fantastic, because it's the future and the reversible plug is very welcome, but annoying because your existing microUSB accessories (of which you have many, I am sure) won't work. As more and more USB C devices filter on to the market, both in mobile phones and laptops, we've checked out some of the compatible accessories available from leading brand Choetech. Here's our thoughts on a selection of their offerings, kindly provided by the company. Choetech 39W USB-C Power Adapter - £16.99 The 3 port USB-C power adaptor is true to a trend in a lot of USB C peripherals at the moment - they also support good old USB A. This makes a lot of sense because most of us still have devices that use the old standard. Charging USB C devices is speedy with this adaptor (as it supports 5V 3A), but there's no specific Qualcomm QuickCharge support on either USB C or A. USB C fast charging is a right old mess at the moment, but the protocols for A are better established. The charger is big but not too chunky, feels well made and has smart switching to send power to the right ports. As with all Choetech products, it's nicely packaged with a small user manual included. This is my main charger for behind the bedside table, where I generally have my phone, tablet and kindle! Choetech 55W Multi USB Charging Station - £18.99 If you need something with a bit more oomph, the charging station is very similar to the above, but with 2 extra USB A ports and one extra USB C port - the overall output capability increases as appropriate. The charging block uses a standard figure-of-8 charging cable (which I like, as I have one from Lindy where the plug folds completely flat for travel!) and includes a stand and adhesive pad for putting it up on end. As with the 39W 3 port adapter, there's no QC support but you do get 5V 3A on USB C. A USB C to USB C cable is included in the box. Choetech 33W USB-C Car Charger - £13.99 Moving on to the car, this is is a really cool little thing. Yes, it only has 2 ports, but as well as the 5V 3A USB C port, it has a fully QuickCharge 3.0 compliant USB A port. This is great in our car, where I juice up my Honor V8 on USB C and my other half charges her Galaxy S7 quickly using the USB A port. What the pictures don't do justice is exactly how small this thing is! Despite this it feels nicely made and more premium than many other car chargers I've used. It has a permanent place in our car now! Choetech 2-Pack USB-C to Micro USB Adapter Convert Connector with 56k Resistor - £5.19 For a while now I've carried a microUSB to USB C adaptor on my keyring. I have the OnePlus version, which looks really nice and has a soft polythene sleeve so you can pop the adaptor in and out. I use it lots, mostly with battery banks... but there's a problem. It's officially 'out of spec', which means I don't really know whether it's doing my devices any harm. Not ideal! With the release of these adapters (which I bought on @gavinlew's recommendation), I can bin those and keep the Choetech ones on my keyring. Now, they're not quite as convenient because when you're using them, they either stay on the keyring or you have to unthread them, but it is nice to be safe in the knowledge they're not going to blow up my phone! Choetech USB-C Digital AV Adapter - £31.99 As well as all the phone accessories, I've been testing out a couple of USB C accessories for my so-equipped laptop, a Dell XPS 13. The Digital AV adaptor is particularly useful for me, as the XPS doesn't include a HDMI port! Included in the adaptor is a USB C passthrough with support for power delivery (so you can use it for charging), the HDMI port and a speedy USB 3 port. The silver metal is really co-ordinated to a silver Macbook (and on that device, with its single port, it'd be particularly useful) but it's a staple in my XPS' laptop bag too. Again, it all feels very premium and well made, as it should do for the price (although it compares well to equivalent products). I can't wait until our phones and tablets support this sort of device. Choetech Aluminium 4 Port USB3.0 HUB - £11.99 Finally comes the 4 port hub. Again, this is a particularly useful accessory for a Macbook, offering 4 USB A 3.0 ports and a USB C to A cable in the box for connecting it to your machine. The look is very similar to the Digital AV Adapter, with soft touch aluminium and a really quality finish. I kinda wish a A-A cable was included in the box too, so I could use the hub with my iMac! What's missing? The one USB C peripheral I really want at the moment (but nobody seems to make) is a battery bank with a USB C cable built in. Everybody makes them with microUSB or Lightning cables built in, but not USB C. I don't like having to carry a cable around with my battery bank... so I hope that appears soon!
  7. I've been working on creating the basic device tree needed to get the latest TWRP built for our Honor 8 and most importantly, accepted as an official TWRP recovery. Until the recovery is officially approved, you can download a test version here! Flash using 'fastboot flash recovery filename.img' from bootloader on a bootloader unlocked device. DOWNLOAD - twrp-3.0.2-0-frd-modaco-rc1.img - MD5: 4de532c99f03dccc9f277107fe03f87f P
  8. Please keep posts on topic, personal attacks will not be tolerated. P
  9. I'm pleased to present my MoDaCo Custom ROM for the Honor 8 FRD-L09! READ THIS WHOLE POST BEFORE YOU START! No, really, it contains everything you need to know. About MoDaCo Custom ROMs MoDaCo Custom ROMs are based on official ROMs. A MCR release is designed to feel like a stock Emotion UI ROM with optimisations, tweaks and complimentary additions that enhance the user experience. The aim of a MCR is to be ultra reliable for use on an everyday device. This ROM is part of the 'Unified Honor ROM' project - ROMs with the same changes are available for all current Honor devices. A MCR version with a more 'stock Android' like interface is under development. Requirements In order to use this ROM you must have a custom recovery (e.g. TWRP) installed. The ROM is installed at your own risk. A wipe IS recommended if coming from a ROM other than MCR or stock. BACK UP YOUR DEVICE BEFORE INSTALLATION! Features Based on the B101 custom ROM starter template (you may use MCR as a base for your own ROM) ROM fully optimised with the unique MCR scripts Updated power management policies to reduce instances of 'missing notifications' All apps in ROM updates to latest versions (a considerable saving of over 1GB on /data!) Busybox installed sepolicy patched boot image ready for root selinux permissive Removed 'icons' from /system/themes (themes no longer need to include default icons again) MoDaCo Custom Kitchen (coming soon!) Multi user support Multi window support Preloaded Stockify theme stub Numerous other small refinements - please see the gitlab commits for full details This ROM is completely in version control at gitlab! https://gitlab.com/u/paulobrien/projects Want more tweaks and changes? Post your requests in the support topic. Changelog Please see the post below this one for the changelog. Installation You should install this ROM on a device that has previously been updated to the B102 release. To install this ROM: Download the zip file from the links below and copy to your internal / external SD card. Restart your device in recovery mode PERFORM A BACKUP FROM THE MENU Select the option to apply an update zip, and select the zip file you copied to the SD card. Important Note: As this ROM is partially deodexed, first boot can take a long time. If you have not wiped, you can check for any issues with adb logcat. Be patient! Downloads Please do not mirror these downloads elsewhere. DOWNLOAD - r7-modacocustomrom-honor-8-frdl09-frd-b101.zip [ROMRAID] MD5: 974d74780a7fc1b664355cd6d16e2d18 Support If you have a general question, please post in the topic. Thanks It's impossible to mention everyone who contributes to the Android community by name, but to everyone out there who does great work and shares it with us all - you have my gratitude and respect. Future Updates - READ THIS! By providing this ROM I am not guaranteeing that future updates will follow. Due to limits on my time and the fact that I have a large number of devices for short periods of time, it isn't possible for me to continue providing ROM updates indefinitely. And finally... Enjoy! P
  10. As well as my main Custom ROM for all current Honor devices, I am excited to announce a Beta release of the 'Stock Style' version. This ROM is based on the main MCR, but has a host of changes to provide a more 'stock Android' experience! Changes include... Removed all 'additional apps' installed from cust (Twitter, Games etc.) Replaced Calculator with Google Calculator Replaced Calendar with Google Calendar Replaced Clock with Google Clock Replaced Contacts with Google Contacts Replaced Dialler with Google Dialler Replaced Gallery with Google Photos (can still be launched straight from Camera) Replaced Phone with Google Phone Replaced Messaging with Google Messenger Removed Email / Exchange app (now replaced by Gmail Exchange support) Removed File Manager Removed HiCare Removed Music app Removed Notepad app Removed Sound Recorder app Removed Videos app Removed Weather app Updated default theme to Stockify Added missing 'base GMS' apps as required The ROM feels much less EMUI and much more stock Android, without losing stability, compatibility, features etc. With future releases of the Stockify theme, we should also be able to virtually revert the notification pulldown / toggles (SystemUI) and lockscreen to stock style too. Have a play and let me know what you think - a wipe is highly recommended before installing this ROM. DOWNLOAD - r7-modacocustomrom-stockstyle-honor-8-frdl09-frd-b101.zip [ROMRAID] - MD5: c6bb57687ed3e36580c02f8abb9aff36 Enjoy! P
  11. I'm going to straight up admit that, while EMUI does add a ton of useful tweaks and improvements to Android, not everything in it is to everybody's taste, particularly if you are a big stock Android fan. In this guide (which was written based on Honor 8 software version B101 but probably works well on most Huawei / Honor devices), I'll take you through ways to make your device feel more like stock. Feedback is welcomed and I'll be updating this document frequently with additional info and improvements. I am going to walk through the process from a freshly reset device, but you can of course pick out just the bits you want! Launcher After going through the setup wizard on your device and configuring your Play Store account, one of the first things you will likely want to do is replace the standard EMUI launcher. It's particularly non-stock feeling due to it's lack of app drawer. This is nice and easy, because the standard Android launcher is available from the Play Store. The process From the Play Store, ensure all currently installed apps are up to date (particularly 'Google'). From the Play Store, install 'Google Now Launcher'. In the Settings app, select the 'Apps' option, press the Advanced button and select 'Default app settings'. In this screen you can specify the standard Launcher. Choose 'Google App'. Press the home key and you're done, you should now have the standard launcher! Further tips On pre-Marshmallow devices, you may notice that third party launchers (including Google's) don't correctly make the top and bottom bars transparent. Sadly this includes my favourite launcher, Action Launcher 3. Another alternative, Nova Launcher, does have this feature however. Icon themes As you can see in the above images, even with a custom launcher installed, many icons (such as the Play Store) are 'customised'. These backgrounds are applied using a theme. The default Honor 7 theme is called 'Spectrum', but I've made a special version, 'Spectrum Pure' that removes these icon customisations. The process From this post on MoDaCo, download the 'Spectrum Pure' .hwt theme file. Copy the .hwt file to /sdcard/HWThemes on your device (you can use the built in 'Files' app for this if needed). Launch the 'Themes' app, select the 'Mine' tab, select 'Spectrum Pure' and press 'Apply'. When you go back to the homescreen, your customisations should be gone! Note that some launchers need to be restarted to pick up the change, so if in doubt, reboot your device. Third party apps A number of third party apps are installed out of the box, thinks like '50+ free games, 'Bubble Bash', 'Dragon Mania', and Puzzle Pets. You can get rid of these if you prefer. The process In the 'Settings' app, select the 'Apps' option. Select the app you would like to disable in the list and press the 'Uninstall' button. Further tips The Facebook and Twitter apps can be removed in the same way if you don't want to use them. Additional Honor apps As well as third party apps, a number of additional apps are included by Honor that have no stock Android equivalent. You can remove, in the same way as above: Backup Compass Honor Club Mirror Smart Controller (if you remove this though, you will need to install a different app to enable IR functionality) Vmall WPS Office The process In the 'Settings' app, select the 'Apps' option. Select the app you would like to disable in the list and press the 'Uninstall' button. Disabling un-uninstallable apps The above apps are all easily uninstalled, but there are also other apps that while you can't uninstall them, you can disable them. The apps you might want to disable are: Email (if for example you are using the Gmail app instead) HiCare Magnifier Notepad Weather The process In the 'Settings' app, select the 'Apps' option. Select the app you would like to disable in the list and press the 'Disable' button (this will be greyed out for system apps). Keyboards Out of the box the Honor 7 includes a Huawei customised version of Swype and 'Android Keyboard (AOSP)', which is a basic build of the stock Android keyboard. If you are not using Swype and you want to use the stock Keyboard, you should use the Play Store version rather than the provided build to ensure you get updated. The process From the Play Store, install 'Google Keyboard'. Launch Google Keyboard and complete the setup wizard (this is important!). In the 'Settings' app, select the 'Apps' option. Select the 'Menu' button and the 'Show System' option. Select 'Android Keyboard (AOSP)' and press 'Disable'. Select 'Huawei Swype' and press 'Disable'. Calendar Honor have replaced the stock Calendar app with their own, however Google Calendar can be installed from the Play Store. The Honor Calendar app is not un-installable or disableable, however using adb access from a computer, there is another solution. The process From the Play Store, install 'Google Calendar'. On your device, enable USB debugging by tapping on the 'Build Number' in 'Settings' -> 'About' multiple times, then from the newly visible development menu, clicking the 'USB Debugging' checkbox. On your computer, from a command prompt / terminal, run the command 'adb shell' - accept the security prompt on your device. Run the command 'pm hide com.android.calendar'. You should now have only one Calendar app in your launcher, as shown below (before / after shot!). Clock Just as with the Calendar app above, the stock Android clock application can be downloaded and the Honor equivalent disabled using ADB. The process From the Play Store, install 'Google Clock'. If you haven't already done so, on your device, enable USB debugging by tapping on the 'Build Number' in 'Settings' -> 'About' multiple times, then from the newly visible development menu, clicking the 'USB Debugging' checkbox. On your computer, from a command prompt / terminal, run the command 'adb shell' - accept the security prompt on your device if required. Run the command 'pm hide com.android.deskclock'. You should now have only one Clock app in your launcher. Messaging If you are not a fan of the Honor Messaging app, you can download and install the Google version and, once again, remove the Honor version. The process From the Play Store, install 'Google Messenger'. Launch the app and set it as your preferred handler for text messages. If you haven't already done so, on your device, enable USB debugging by tapping on the 'Build Number' in 'Settings' -> 'About' multiple times, then from the newly visible development menu, clicking the 'USB Debugging' checkbox. On your computer, from a command prompt / terminal, run the command 'adb shell' - accept the security prompt on your device if required. Run the command 'pm hide com.android.mms'. You should now have only one Messaging app in your launcher. Files, Music, Recorder, Videos Stock Android doesn't have a Files app per se, nor music, recorder or video apps. These can be removed using the same method as above. The process If you haven't already done so, on your device, enable USB debugging by tapping on the 'Build Number' in 'Settings' -> 'About' multiple times, then from the newly visible development menu, clicking the 'USB Debugging' checkbox. On your computer, from a command prompt / terminal, run the command 'adb shell' - accept the security prompt on your device if required. To remove 'Files': Run the command 'pm hide com.huawei.hidisk'. To remove 'Music': Run the command 'pm hide com.android.mediacenter'. To remove 'Recorder': Run the command 'pm hide com.android.soundrecorder'. To remove 'Videos': Run the command 'pm hide com.huawei.hwvplayer'. These applications should now have disappeared from your launcher. Screen Lock and Torch The Screen Lock and Torch shortcuts are currently parts of packages that can't be disabled without ill effects - these need to be removed via a custom ROM. FM Radio This can be removed using the 'pm hide' process, but this will remove all FM Radio functionality (there is currently no stock Android equivalent app). Calculator The stock Android calculator currently isn't available from the Play Store - I will post the APK here in due course. Contacts / Dialler The Contacts / Dialler cannot be changed to the stock Android versions at this time. Notification pulldown / Settings app / Stock app icons / Lockscreen The notification pulldown colours, settings app colours and icons, stock app icons and lockscreen can be modified using a custom theme. I am working on a 'Stock Android' EMUI theme that I will post here in due course. Stay tuned.
  12. This is for the FRD-L09 model only. Full ROM packages: B101 EMUI 4.1 Android 6.0.1 (United Kingdom) - DOWNLOAD (ROMraid) - MD5: 63b8a82cd4af5360b5d34f9b2829059d To flash, extract the 'part1' file to a SD card as /dload then insert into a powered off device with plenty of battery and NO USB CABLE ATTACHED. Power on with both volume buttons held and allow the flash to complete. Repeat the process with the 'part2' directory afterwards.
  13. Stockify is a theme for Emotion UI (EMUI) that restores a more 'stock' Android look to your device. It is tested and optimised for the 8, as shown above! To install, download from the Play Store, launch the app and press the install button. You will then be directed to the Theme chooser on your device, where you can select the Stockify theme. You will automatically receive theme updates via the Play Store! The Stockify installer system is Open Source - if you make your own themes, you too can distribute them via the Play Store! More details can be found here at GitLab. Enjoy! :) P
  14. All Honor devices currently shipped with a locked bootloader. As long as manufacturers provide a way to unlock, then we're down with that - it helps keep your device secure and means that if you lose it, it's harder for people to steal your data (the process of unlocking the bootloader wipes the phone). There are two ways to unlock your Honor phones bootloader, which will then allow you to install things like custom recoveries, custom kernels / ROMs etc. The first is using the official Honor method, which is free, and the second is using a third party, which costs €4 Euros, but may be the quickest option if the official method isn't working for you. The official method In order to unlock your Honor device using the official method, complete the following steps: Visit https://www.emui.com/en/plugin.php?id=unlock&mod=detail and either create a new account or login with an existing Huawei account. In the form displayed after logging in, enter: Your phone model (FRD-L09 for the Honor 8) Your phone serial number (this can be found in Settings -> About -> Status) Your phone IMEI1 (this can be found in Settings -> About -> Status) Your phone product ID (to find this, open the dialler and enter *#*#1357946#*#*) The captcha code Press the 'Submit' button. At this point you will either be provided with a code, or you will receive an error such as 'The Huawei ID used to apply for the unlock code has not been used on the device for more than 14 days.' If you get the error, you will need to use the unofficial method below. Open a command window on your PC / Mac, which needs to have 'adb' and 'fastboot' installed from the Android SDK. Enable USB debugging by tapping the build number in Settings -> About 5 times, then going back and selecting the option from the Development menu. Enable OEM unlock in the Development menu. Connect your phone to the PC and approve the security prompt on the device screen. In the command window on your PC / Mac, enter 'adb reboot bootloader' to enter fastboot mode'. In the command window on your PC / Mac, enter 'fastboot oem unlock [insertnumberhere]', of course using the number provided by the Huawei site. YOUR PHONE WILL WIPE ITSELF AT THIS POINT! That's it! You're done! The unofficial method In order to unlock your Honor device using the unofficial method, if for example you receive the '14 day' error from the Huwei site, complete the following steps: On a Windows PC, download and install DC-unlocker from https://www.dc-unlocker.com/. On your phone, enter Manufacturer Mode - open the dialler and enter *#*#2846579#*#*. In the app that then opens, select Project Menu -> Background settings -> USB ports settings -> Manufacturer Mode. Download the Huawei driver pack from https://files.dc-unlocker.com/share.html?v=share/88D4A98C154D4E19AF9D4A1EF09BA620. Install the Huawei driver pack by extracting the file you just downloaded (using WinRAR or similar) and running 'DriverSetup' After installing the driver pack, connect your phone to the PC. In Device Manager, after the automated driver install, you should have no 'Unknown Devices'. Launch the previously downloaded DC-unlocker application. From the drop down lists, select 'Huawei Phones' and 'Auto Detect Model'. Press the magnifying glass icon - the app will then search for your phone. You should see an image like the one below showing your phone is found. At this point, press the 'Buy Credits' option to set up your DC-Unlocker account and purchase the 4 credits required for code retrieval (this will cost €4). You can also do this directly from the DC-Unlocker website. After your credit purchase is complete, click the 'Server' section and enter your new DC-unlocker login details. Press 'Check Login' to validate the details (if the server is busy, this may take multiple attempts). Click the 'Unlocking' section, and click 'Read Bootloader Code'. Do NOT click 'Unlock'. Again, if the server is busy, this may take multiple attempts. The white area of the app will now display the bootloader code. Screen grab this just in case! Open a command window on your PC, which needs to have 'adb' and 'fastboot' installed from the Android SDK. Enable USB debugging by tapping the build number in Settings -> About 5 times, then going back and selecting the option from the Development menu. Enable OEM unlock in the Development menu. Connect your phone to the PC and approve the security prompt on the device screen. In the command window on your PC / Mac, enter 'adb reboot bootloader' to enter fastboot mode'. In the command window on your PC / Mac, enter 'fastboot oem unlock [insertnumberhere]', of course using the number provided by the DC-Unlocker process. YOUR PHONE WILL WIPE ITSELF AT THIS POINT! That's it! You're done!
  15. When you're messing around with hacking your Honor 8, it's actually very difficult to brick. Believe me, I've tried! But it is easy to get in a situation where, if you don't know the relevant key combos, you can get a bit stuck. To help avoid this, I'm clarifying the key combos for our devices below. The key thing to note is that the keys can behave differently depending on whether you have a cable to a computer plugged in or not. No cable plugged in: Volume down + tap power button: Normal boot Volume up + tap power button: Recovery mode (reboot / factory reset / wipe cache options or TWRP if flashed) Both volume buttons + tap power button: Flash dload image from microSD card Connected to a computer: Volume down + Power on: Fastboot mode (exit with 'fastboot reboot' or a long power button press) Volume up + Power on: Huawei eRecovery (reboot / download / shutdown options - used for 'recovery loop' fix, see below) Both volume buttons + Power on: Flash image via HiSuite (NOT from microSD card) The key one here is the 'both buttons' combo. When you get your device very broken, the restore method of choice is to use a microSD with a dload folder. Based on the above, remember you need to do the both buttons combo WITHOUT a cable plugged in, or it will try and use HiSuite instead of the card. Lots of people have noted that when using TWRP, the device can get into a continuous recovery loop. The fix for this is actually very easy - go into eRecovery (volume up and power on when connected to a computer) and select 'Shutdown'. When you then power the device on, it will boot normally instead of booting to recovery. One final thing - when flashing from microSD, be VERY careful. Flashing a Lollipop image over Marshmallow without using the rollback image can make bad things happen, wherever possible try and flash a full image that matches the build you are using. Hope this is helpful! :) P
  16. Some apps (such as Huawei Health) are installed on your device during the initial boot. They can, however, be uninstalled, and there's no obvious way to get them back. Here's how you do it! The APKs live in the /cust directory on your device. You can either pull them (using ADB, e.g. 'adb pull /cust/preinstalled/public/app/') or use a file explorer app to browse to the same directory and click the APK you want to install. Easy! :) P
  17. There are a huge number of EMUI themes, many of which include a custom font. But what if a theme installs a font you don't like? How do you avoid being stuck with 'Comic Sans'? Up to now there's been no easy way, as even switching back to another theme doesn't reset the font. For this reason, I have created a special theme that restores the stock font. Install it, apply it, then your stock font is back and you can apply other themes. Simple! The theme can be downloaded from the Play Store here - Font Reset theme for EMUI - Android Apps on Google Play Enjoy! P
  18. Note: This guide is only tested on the Honor 8 B101 Marshmallow release Marshmallow on the Honor 8 is great, making a very nice device feel even better. But one thing missing is the option to 'adopt' microSD cards as Internal Storage. Fear not, you can do it manually! In order to set adopted storage up, you will need a computer with working 'adb' and, of course, a microSD card in your phone, the faster the better. Here's the process! 1. BACK UP THE DATA YOU HAVE ON YOUR MICROSD CARD. Your card will be formatted by this process, so make sure you have saved any pictures, videos etc. from your card to your PC before you start. 2. Decide how you want to split your card. You can either commit 100% of the card to internal storage, or split between internal storage and conventional SD. This option is useful if you like to unplug your card and put it in your PC. I would probably recommend committing the whole card. 3. Open your command window / terminal on your computer and type the 'adb shell' command (with your phone connected of course). You will need to enable USB debugging in developer settings (which in turn is displayed by tapping the build number of the device 5 times) in order to see the option. 4. Type 'sm list-disks' to list the disks available for adoption. It'll look something like below - take note of the disk ID (disk:179:160 in this example). 5. Partition the disk. For this we use the 'sm partition DISK TYPE RATIO' command. For example, to partition the disk above as fully adopted storage (aka private) I'd use the command 'sm partition disk:179:160 private'. If I wanted a 50/50 split between adopted and regular, I'd use the command 'sm partition disk:179:160 mixed 50'. Easy right? 6. This process will take a while, but when it's done, the Settings -> Additional Settings -> Storage view on your device should show the new Internal Storage. Note that, for some reason, the free space isn't reported correctly, however everything seems to work OK. When you install apps, they will generally install automatically to the adopted SD, although you can manually move things around if you want to, perhaps for performance reasons (the real Internal storage will likely always be a bit faster). 7. If you want to see how you are doing for space, you can use a third party tool such as FreeSpace or FreeSpace Plus. And that's it! Let us know how you get on, and enjoy your new, expanded Honor 8! P
  19. Let's get some custom ROM tweaking going on for our 8s! :) Together with my own MoDaCo Custom ROM for the Honor 8, I've created a custom ROM starter template for anyone who wants to have a go. It's a bit different. Basically, this ROM template will let you create your own custom ROM VERY easily. Easier than ever before. All you have to do is... download my ROM template zip make the changes to the system of your phone just as you'd like them for your custom ROM run some commands on your device via ADB add the resulting files to the template zip That's it! No messing around with install scripts, no rebuilding anything complex, just mod - and go! ;-) Preparation ONLY if you are completing the process for the first time, you need to set up a file on your microSD card - so launch an ADB shell and type the following commands... touch /sdcard/exclude echo app > /sdcard/exclude echo priv-app >> /sdcard/exclude echo delapp >> /sdcard/exclude ROM build Once you have your system up and running how you want it, and you're ready to distribute it (just the system and cust dirs mind, it won't pull the data dir, so your personal data is safe), reboot to recovery, launch an ADB shell and type the following commands: mount /system tar -X /sdcard/exclude -zcvpf /sdcard/system.therest.tar.gz /system/ tar -zcvpf /sdcard/system.apps.tar.gz /system/app /system/priv-app /system/delapp mount /cust tar -zcvpf /sdcard/cust.tar.gz /cust You'll then end up with 3 new files on your SD card - system.apps.tar.gz (which is apps and priv-apps from system), system.therest.tar.gz (which, as the name suggests, is the rest of the system partition!) and cust.tar.gz with is the cust partition contents. Update the template zip with these 3 files and that's it. It's ready to distribute for people to flash via TWRP! If you have updated the boot image, you'll need to replace that too, the easiest way is to do a TWRP backup then pull that file from the SD card and drop it into the template zip as boot.img. That's really it! I hope this inspires a few people to start playing around with custom ROMs for the 8... more cool things coming soon! :) Oh and the all important template file... DOWNLOAD - r1-customromtemplate-honor-8-frdl09-frd-b101.zip [ROMRAID] MD5: d08ae99f09aebb256905e277706eebb8 P
  20. It probably would disable Pay if there's a system partition check. P
  21. If you are using a Huawei / Honor device without DT2W (double tap to wake), you can enable it using this zip file (apply from TWRP). Points to note... support is still kernel dependent so even though the option will appear in smart assistance -> motion control, it may not work for all devices (I'm looking into potential kernel changes for unsupported devices) backup everything before installing this change is tested on the Huawei P9 You can download the zip file from Gitlab, where the source is also hosted. Enjoy! P
  22. No idea actually! Would be interesting to know, keep us posted! P
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