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PaulOBrien

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Everything posted by PaulOBrien

  1. PaulOBrien

    Where to buy

    The Smart ultra 6 is available to buy direct from Vodafone in White / Silver or Grey / Black on contract or pay as you go. P
  2. Hi all! I've uploaded the stock ROM dload file for the P9, version B136 for the EVA-L09 variant. Copy the dload folder to a microSD card, turn off the phone and turn it back on with no PC connected cable inserted, holding both volume buttons. Make sure you have plenty of battery left. Your device will likely be wiped. USE AT YOUR OWN RISK! Download - dload-huawei-p9-eval09-eva-b136.zip - [MEGA] P
  3. Hi all! I've started playing more with my Kindle Fire so i've made a first early MoDaCo Custom ROM for the device. Flashing is recommended using TWRP, ALWAYS BACK UP BEFORE FLASHING! Wipe is not required. Features: Based on the 6.3.1 release Heavily optimised and compressed to take as little space as possible and perform as fast as possible! Includes Google Services Framework and Google Play Store, masquerading as Galaxy Tab for maximum app availability Optional Google Books / Music Network location support (for Maps etc.) Rooted with Superuser Insecure boot image (for 'adb remount' etc.) init.d support TweakDeck Twitter client Kindle Fire version (can be uninstalled) I'll be doing more tweaks as I mess around with the device more together with more kitchen features, so watch this space. :) Prebakes are available for everyone to download, the MoDaCo Online Kitchen is available to MoDaCo AdFree and MoDaCo Plus members. NEW - you can now get MoDaCo AdFree for FREE via TrialPay - click here for details! Gr9.2 - DOWNLOAD (ROMraid) - MD5: 569fe6550cfcfba68dabc3d088324a46 Gr9.2 AltROM - DOWNLOAD (ROMraid) - MD5: e1a061885eae1acadeabc68641cff25d P
  4. Hi all! I am looking at getting official TWRP support for the Mate 8 (aka 'Next') (as I have for the other Huawei / Honor devices. After creating a basic build tree, I have been spending countless hours reversing the decryption routines from the stock recovery and the good news is - I have a RC build online ready to try, complete with /data decryption! I will be submitting the files for official TWRP support shortly, but in the mean time you can check out the build below. Flash using 'fastboot flash recovery' and, of course, use at your own risk. DOWNLOAD (EMUI 4.0) - twrp-3.0.2-0-next-modaco-rc3.img - MD5: 11a70f0570d4c3b9cb528c72b04f2c0f DOWNLOAD (EMUI 4.1) - twrp-3.0.2-0-next-modaco-rc3-emui41.img - MD5: 47b2e68a1ace6fcd24953cbbd419c582 P
  5. Right now, if you want to try out the Play Store on Chrome OS, there are 3 devices you can use to do so. The Asus Chromebook Flip, the Acer Chromebook R11 and the Google Chromebook Pixel 2015. Of the three, I think the Acer is the best bet and right now, you can pick up a factory refurbished unit from Argos for only £124.99 inclusive. I bought one and it looks brand new. So why the Acer? Simply because it's a pretty good device and the other two have what I would deem fatal flaws. Now don't get me wrong, the Chromebook Flip in particular is a cool little piece of hardware. It's compact, light and very well made. It does however use a Rockchip ARM processor which isn't the most sprightly and the 10.1" screen can feel cramped. Thankfully the keyboard is a decent size, thanks to the devices large bezels. The real kicker though is the £250 price tag. Even with 4GB RAM, it's just too expensive. Hardware wise, the Chromebook Pixel has everything going for it. But it costs a fortune. No sale. The Chromebook R11 isn't perfect. It's pretty heavy, it too has chunky bezels and it comes with 'only' 2GB RAM / 16GB storage (realistically, both OK for Chromebooks). But it's very nicely made with a 'Yoga' style hinge and aluminium top plate, it's Celeron 3050 processor offers pretty good performance and at £125, it's a steal. OK, so the 1280x800 looks poor next to modern retina offers, but it's bright, perfectly usable and, of course, touchable. Battery life, as with most Chromebooks, is epic. Play Store on Chrome OS is currently undergoing ongoing development, so you'll need to switch your machine to the dev channel from the About menu. But when you do, you soon realise what a massive change this is going to be for Chromebooks (and just imagine if Google can somehow shoe-horn this into desktop Chrome!). Word, Excel et al all work fine, as does the Gmail app, as do most apps. It's not perfect, there are bugs, but for a lot of people the implementation will take Chromebooks from the realms of web browsing curios to legitimate primary devices. Seriously. If you want to pick up the R11, head on over to Argos on Ebay quickly before they sell out. If you use TopCashback you'll get £1.31 cashback too, bringing the price down to £123.68. I ordered Sunday and it arrived Monday. Impressive service. Let us know how you find the experience if you do order! View full item
  6. Right now, if you want to try out the Play Store on Chrome OS, there are 3 devices you can use to do so. The Asus Chromebook Flip, the Acer Chromebook R11 and the Google Chromebook Pixel 2015. Of the three, I think the Acer is the best bet and right now, you can pick up a factory refurbished unit from Argos for only £124.99 inclusive. I bought one and it looks brand new. So why the Acer? Simply because it's a pretty good device and the other two have what I would deem fatal flaws. Now don't get me wrong, the Chromebook Flip in particular is a cool little piece of hardware. It's compact, light and very well made. It does however use a Rockchip ARM processor which isn't the most sprightly and the 10.1" screen can feel cramped. Thankfully the keyboard is a decent size, thanks to the devices large bezels. The real kicker though is the £250 price tag. Even with 4GB RAM, it's just too expensive. Hardware wise, the Chromebook Pixel has everything going for it. But it costs a fortune. No sale. The Chromebook R11 isn't perfect. It's pretty heavy, it too has chunky bezels and it comes with 'only' 2GB RAM / 16GB storage (realistically, both OK for Chromebooks). But it's very nicely made with a 'Yoga' style hinge and aluminium top plate, it's Celeron 3050 processor offers pretty good performance and at £125, it's a steal. OK, so the 1280x800 looks poor next to modern retina offers, but it's bright, perfectly usable and, of course, touchable. Battery life, as with most Chromebooks, is epic. Play Store on Chrome OS is currently undergoing ongoing development, so you'll need to switch your machine to the dev channel from the About menu. But when you do, you soon realise what a massive change this is going to be for Chromebooks (and just imagine if Google can somehow shoe-horn this into desktop Chrome!). Word, Excel et al all work fine, as does the Gmail app, as do most apps. It's not perfect, there are bugs, but for a lot of people the implementation will take Chromebooks from the realms of web browsing curios to legitimate primary devices. Seriously. If you want to pick up the R11, head on over to Argos on Ebay quickly before they sell out. If you use TopCashback you'll get £1.31 cashback too, bringing the price down to £123.68. I ordered Sunday and it arrived Monday. Impressive service. Let us know how you find the experience if you do order!
  7. PaulOBrien

    Review: Nest Learning Thermostat

    In the race to connect everything to the Internet, there are some devices that just make sense. Connected heating (and hot water) control is one such case - we can likely all think of a time when we would like to have switched our heating on or off from outside the home. With the backing of Alphabet, Nest is unquestionably one of the giants in this field - but how does reality match up to the promised convenience? We tried out the latest Nest Learning Thermostat to find out. Our Nest was provided and installed by Nest directly A 3rd generation Nest is priced at £199 if self installed, or £249 installed by a Nest engineer (recommended) You can learn more about Nest at https://nest.com/uk/thermostat/install-and-explore/ Installation Installation by the Nest contracted engineer was very quick – he was obviously used to the procedure and looked like he could have completed the installation with his eyes shut. The install process involves installing the 'Nest Heat Link' (the brains of the system) alongside the boiler, which then connects wirelessly to the Nest thermostat itself. After completing the installation, the run through that he gave us for using the system was informative and straight forward. Surprisingly, he did not emphasise the learning behaviour of the Nest so that it creates a tailored schedule for the heating. He instead encouraged us to set our own heating schedule, which he showed us how to do quite simply. We understood that the learning behaviour of the Nest would then tweak this schedule based on observed behaviours. As a family, we have quite a regular daily routine, so it was easy to create our own schedule straight away after installation. In use In use, we have found the Nest controller itself self-explanatory, and further information was easy to find on the Nest website, which was where we really discovered the Nest’s ability to create the schedules for you, via the online video. The best thing about the Nest system is the fact that it can be controlled using the Android (or iOS) application (as well as using the touch sensitive screen and body of the unit of course). Our old system used a standard radio thermostat, which controlled the boiler via a programmable timer panel in the garage. In order to change the timer settings, or to boost the central heating or hot water, we had to climb over bicycles and junk boxes in the cold garage to reach the control panel. We can now control everything without even leaving the comfort of the sofa via the Nest App. The remote control via our mobiles is particularly useful to boost the water system before we arrive home - being hockey players a hot shower is always needed after a match or training, and the remote function ensures that there is no wait for the water to heat up when we get back, should it have been outside the scheduled heating times. This is the scenario that I suspect most people will think of when they consider Nest and the reality actually is every bit as good as you would imagine. It is evident that the Nest is noticing us as we go about our business – the funky fish-eye screen wakes up with our motion as we pass (we have the thermostat on a Nest stand, positioned on our telephone table in the hallway). We have our home screen set to the analogue clock, so this in itself is useful as we leave the house. With a busy household with three kids, there is usually someone passing the sensor every five minutes. However, there is a slight problem if someone is at home alone, maybe holed up in a room working for hours without a break. It is at this point when you notice the heating has gone off Nest thinks you are out. Our installation engineer did suggest using add-on geo-fencing apps so that the location of family members' mobile phones would interact with the Nest and let it know that you were home so keep the heat on. We have not tried this yet, but the idea seems sensible (as long as you always remember to take your mobile out with you on leaving the house!) Some small areas for improvement The main drawback we have come across with Nest is that it does not allow the schedule to set the temperature below 9°C. As the ambient temperature of the house creeps below this temperature during the night, this obviously causes our boiler to fire up, which in turn wakes us up and disturbs our sleep. Our house is quite well insulated, so during our cold winter spells here in the UK it is unlikely to get cold enough over one night to actually freeze any pipes if the heating is off for just 7 hours or so. We certainly didn’t have any pipes freeze with our old thermostat system during the night whist it was off. With the Nest, we have had to switch the system off manually at night and then on again in the morning to avoid night-time boiler activation for nights when sleep was paramount. Otherwise, we will just have to get used to the noise in the night. The thermostat has lost internet connectivity a few times for no apparent reason – this has to be rectified manually at the thermostat. There is no notification via the mobile app or email for this issue, so if you are not in to notice the message, you would not know that the system is not working properly. Eco friendliness The history function on the Nest app is both interesting and useful. It shows when the auto-away function has kicked in, therefore saving us heating a house whilst no one is present to feel the benefit. The Nest screen shows a leaf symbol when it thinks that your temperature setting is energy efficient. Nest users are emailed a monthly report on your energy usage, and you are told how many leaves you have earned for that month. Apparently last month we earned a leaf for every day of the month – well done us! Conclusion A £199 (or likely £249, installed) outlay is not inconsiderable particularly if, like most people, you have a 'perfectly good thermostat' now. With that said, the additional convenience, intelligence and functionality offered by Nest takes heating the home from a 'must have' to a genuinely enjoyable experience. With Nest gradually releasing more products such as the smoke alarm and cameras which can share data with the thermostat, together with the 'Works with Nest' programme to integrate with smart home hardware from third parties, perhaps the Internet of Things isn't just a gimmick after all. Head on over to the Nest website to learn more / purchase. Nest is currently available to NPower customers for £129 / £199 installed. The older 'V2' Nest is currently £119 at Screwfix. View full item
  8. PaulOBrien

    Review: Nest Learning Thermostat

    In the race to connect everything to the Internet, there are some devices that just make sense. Connected heating (and hot water) control is one such case - we can likely all think of a time when we would like to have switched our heating on or off from outside the home. With the backing of Alphabet, Nest is unquestionably one of the giants in this field - but how does reality match up to the promised convenience? We tried out the latest Nest Learning Thermostat to find out. Our Nest was provided and installed by Nest directly A 3rd generation Nest is priced at £199 if self installed, or £249 installed by a Nest engineer (recommended) You can learn more about Nest at https://nest.com/uk/thermostat/install-and-explore/ Installation Installation by the Nest contracted engineer was very quick – he was obviously used to the procedure and looked like he could have completed the installation with his eyes shut. The install process involves installing the 'Nest Heat Link' (the brains of the system) alongside the boiler, which then connects wirelessly to the Nest thermostat itself. After completing the installation, the run through that he gave us for using the system was informative and straight forward. Surprisingly, he did not emphasise the learning behaviour of the Nest so that it creates a tailored schedule for the heating. He instead encouraged us to set our own heating schedule, which he showed us how to do quite simply. We understood that the learning behaviour of the Nest would then tweak this schedule based on observed behaviours. As a family, we have quite a regular daily routine, so it was easy to create our own schedule straight away after installation. In use In use, we have found the Nest controller itself self-explanatory, and further information was easy to find on the Nest website, which was where we really discovered the Nest’s ability to create the schedules for you, via the online video. The best thing about the Nest system is the fact that it can be controlled using the Android (or iOS) application (as well as using the touch sensitive screen and body of the unit of course). Our old system used a standard radio thermostat, which controlled the boiler via a programmable timer panel in the garage. In order to change the timer settings, or to boost the central heating or hot water, we had to climb over bicycles and junk boxes in the cold garage to reach the control panel. We can now control everything without even leaving the comfort of the sofa via the Nest App. The remote control via our mobiles is particularly useful to boost the water system before we arrive home - being hockey players a hot shower is always needed after a match or training, and the remote function ensures that there is no wait for the water to heat up when we get back, should it have been outside the scheduled heating times. This is the scenario that I suspect most people will think of when they consider Nest and the reality actually is every bit as good as you would imagine. It is evident that the Nest is noticing us as we go about our business – the funky fish-eye screen wakes up with our motion as we pass (we have the thermostat on a Nest stand, positioned on our telephone table in the hallway). We have our home screen set to the analogue clock, so this in itself is useful as we leave the house. With a busy household with three kids, there is usually someone passing the sensor every five minutes. However, there is a slight problem if someone is at home alone, maybe holed up in a room working for hours without a break. It is at this point when you notice the heating has gone off Nest thinks you are out. Our installation engineer did suggest using add-on geo-fencing apps so that the location of family members' mobile phones would interact with the Nest and let it know that you were home so keep the heat on. We have not tried this yet, but the idea seems sensible (as long as you always remember to take your mobile out with you on leaving the house!) Some small areas for improvement The main drawback we have come across with Nest is that it does not allow the schedule to set the temperature below 9°C. As the ambient temperature of the house creeps below this temperature during the night, this obviously causes our boiler to fire up, which in turn wakes us up and disturbs our sleep. Our house is quite well insulated, so during our cold winter spells here in the UK it is unlikely to get cold enough over one night to actually freeze any pipes if the heating is off for just 7 hours or so. We certainly didn’t have any pipes freeze with our old thermostat system during the night whist it was off. With the Nest, we have had to switch the system off manually at night and then on again in the morning to avoid night-time boiler activation for nights when sleep was paramount. Otherwise, we will just have to get used to the noise in the night. The thermostat has lost internet connectivity a few times for no apparent reason – this has to be rectified manually at the thermostat. There is no notification via the mobile app or email for this issue, so if you are not in to notice the message, you would not know that the system is not working properly. Eco friendliness The history function on the Nest app is both interesting and useful. It shows when the auto-away function has kicked in, therefore saving us heating a house whilst no one is present to feel the benefit. The Nest screen shows a leaf symbol when it thinks that your temperature setting is energy efficient. Nest users are emailed a monthly report on your energy usage, and you are told how many leaves you have earned for that month. Apparently last month we earned a leaf for every day of the month – well done us! Conclusion A £199 (or likely £249, installed) outlay is not inconsiderable particularly if, like most people, you have a 'perfectly good thermostat' now. With that said, the additional convenience, intelligence and functionality offered by Nest takes heating the home from a 'must have' to a genuinely enjoyable experience. With Nest gradually releasing more products such as the smoke alarm and cameras which can share data with the thermostat, together with the 'Works with Nest' programme to integrate with smart home hardware from third parties, perhaps the Internet of Things isn't just a gimmick after all. Head on over to the Nest website to learn more / purchase. Nest is currently available to NPower customers for £129 / £199 installed. The older 'V2' Nest is currently £119 at Screwfix.
  9. If you have modified your device, are still on Lollipop and you'd like to revert your UK device back to complete stock, then you can use this package. Download the zip, extract and put on a microSD (preversing the dload/UPDATE.APP structure). Turn off your device, plug it into a charger (but not a computer) then, with the microSD inserted, tap the power button while holding volume up and volume down. The update will apply and you will be back to bone stock B130. Your device WILL be wiped. DOWNLOAD - KIW-L21C432B130CUSTC432D005.dload.modaco.zip - MD5: 8b68a8f63986c2a56130c78b67c6d9b3 P
  10. PaulOBrien

    TWRP Recovery 3.0.2.0 for Honor 8

    I've been working on creating the basic device tree needed to get the latest TWRP built for our Honor 8 and most importantly, accepted as an official TWRP recovery. Until the recovery is officially approved, you can download a test version here! Flash using 'fastboot flash recovery filename.img' from bootloader on a bootloader unlocked device. DOWNLOAD - twrp-3.0.2-0-frd-modaco-rc1.img - MD5: 4de532c99f03dccc9f277107fe03f87f P
  11. Forget all the people who told you Vista wouldn't work on the limited space of the Eeee... check out the video below, then check out how to do it :D The Video: * caveat: When I was recording the video, everything felt slower than it was earlier... I realised that I had just turned on Disk Compression, probably didn't help. Should give more space tho :) The Deets: To make this work, I started with... - An Eee PC, completely unmodified (4GB version, 512MB RAM) - A SD card (you'll need this, 2GB minimum, the bigger the better. I'm using 8GB, which are nice and cheap now) - A Vista DVD - A 1GB USB stick Here's what I did! - Download vLite from http://www.vlite.net/, and use to create a custom ISO with bits of Vista removed you don't need, the edition you want (I used Home Premium), such that it'll fit on your USB stick. - Format USB stick with a single FAT32 partition, and set active. I did it in Vista, with the following commands from a command prompt (with admin rights): DISKPART LIST DISK (note the number of your USB drive at this point) SELECT DISK 1 (or the appropriate number from the command above) CLEAN CREATE PARTITION PRIMARY SELECT PARTITION 1 ACTIVE FORMAT FS=32 ASSIGN EXIT[/code] - Copy contents of your newly created ISO to the stick (you can extract the ISO with WinRAR, burn it to CD, mount it with Daemon Tools etc. etc.) - Insert USB stick into Eee - Turn on Eee, pressing escape at startup to select the USB stick as the boot device - Install Vista, configuring 1 single 4GB partition. - You should now have Vista, but chances are there isn't much space left. Ensure your SD card is in the slot at this point, and showing as drive D:. - You need to download PendMoves and MoveFile to your machine from http://www.microsoft.com/technet/sysintern.../PendMoves.mspx. Put them in \Windows\System32 Right, now the clever stuff. The thing that stops Vista playing ball on the Eee is it's HUGE side by side directory, \Windows\winsxs. I mean huge... on my machine it was 1.5GB. The real problem is that it's huge AND very difficult to move. We're gonna put it on SD however ;) - Navigate to the \Windows\WinSXS directory, and view the security properties. You need to first give yourself ownership of the directory, and then give yourself full access (i'd use the administrator account to do this stuff). - Now run a command prompt, and create a dummy directory. Type 'mkdir c:\windows\winsxs.moved' - Now that's done, we're gonna create a junction (like a Symbolic link for Vista). Type 'mklink /J c:\windows\winsxs.link winsxs.moved' - Good, now delete the winsxs.moved directory. Trust me on this one :(. Type 'rmdir c:\windows\winsxs.moved' That's the preperation done. Now we need to use MoveFile to schedule renaming of the winsxs at reboot. This is the magic that will give us control over that nightmare directory. - From the command prompt, run 'movefile c:\windows\winsxs c:\windows\winsxs.moved'. As you can see, this is renaming the winsxs directory before anything can get a hold on it. - From the command prompt, run 'movefile c:\windows\winsxs.link c:\windows\winsxs'. This puts a winsxs directory back (as far as the OS is concerned), so everything doesn't collapse in a heap. - Now type 'pendmoves'. It should show the 2 pending moves you've entered above, with NO ERRORS. If it all looks good, REBOOT! On reboot the critical renames / moves will happen, and we'll be free of the shackles that stopped us messing with that pesky winsxs directory. - When your PC is booted, again open a command prompt, and 'dir c:\windows\winsxs*'. If it's all gone well, you'll see a winsxs.moved real directory, and the winsxs junction. If it HASN'T worked, repeat the above steps! If it's all good, then we're nearly home and dry. All we need to do is relocate WinSXS and amend the junction. - Using Windows Explorer, COPY the whole winsxs.moved directory to a \Windows directory on your SD card. As it's HUGE, it'll take ages, and is often quicker using a USB card reader than the internal card reader. - When this has finished, rename the directory on the SD card from winsxs.moved to winsxs. Go to a command prompt (again!) and type 'rmdir c:\windows\winsxs'. Then, type 'mklink /J c:\windows\winsxs d:\windows\winsxs'. - To be sure everything is happy, in explorer browse to c:\windows\winsxs. You should see a ton of files. They're really on your SD card :( - Reboot After reboot, you should be able to delete c:\windows\winsxs.moved and FINALLY liberate all that disk space. Now you're at the point where you need to tweak your system. This means reducing / moving the page file, disabling hibernation and so on and so forth. To disable hibernation on Vista, drop to a command prompt and type 'powercfg -h off'. There's one last thing you should do. When you download Windows Updates etc., the files get put into C:\Windows\SoftwareDistribution, and this will quickly become huge. I recommend moving this to the SD too. It's easier though... stop Windows Update service, move directory, create junction, restart service, DONE! It goes without saying that when you install apps (e.g. i'm gonna put Office 2007 on), you should install them to D:\Program Files - your SD - where appropriate! Job done, you have Vista on your EEE :D [b]Please let me know how you get on![/b] P
  12. In this topic i've posted a custom recovery that allows developers to create custom ROMs. To show this in action, i've deodexed and prerooted the TW 10.4.11.13 update, as well as removing the recovery overwrite function. This should let developers have a look at what's involved in creating them, provide a deodexed base to work from and provide modders with a deodexed ROM to tweak. A good starting point to more custom ROMs I hope! Enjoy! :) DOWNLOAD (ROMraid) - MD5: c7bfcf326db5230ffcd729f19c7a0a53 I've flashed this on my device and it's running great, but use at your own risk of course. :) Note that if you are flashing to / from a different region (e.g. WWE<>TW) then as your device is being re-partitioned, you may need to wipe. If the initial flash fails, wipe data, then flash again. If this flash still fails, restart recovery then flash again. :) P
  13. The Z1 from Lenovo backed Zuk will soon be launching in Western markets, however the device is already on sale in China. That's the good news. The bad news? It's running ZukUI, a custom Android skin - sans Play Store of course - which looks remarkably similar to MIUI. Fear not intrepid importers... you can convert your device to Cyanogen OS (albeit a preview version). Full details can be found in this topic in the Zuk forum. The build is watermarked currently, but it updates via OTA and I understand the full version is imminent. Enjoy! View full item
  14. The Z1 from Lenovo backed Zuk will soon be launching in Western markets, however the device is already on sale in China. That's the good news. The bad news? It's running ZukUI, a custom Android skin - sans Play Store of course - which looks remarkably similar to MIUI. Fear not intrepid importers... you can convert your device to Cyanogen OS (albeit a preview version). Full details can be found in this topic in the Zuk forum. The build is watermarked currently, but it updates via OTA and I understand the full version is imminent. Enjoy!
  15. PaulOBrien

    Welcome to the LeTV forum

    Welcome to the new LeTV forum! This forum was requested by user @dakok who is now a LeTV forum ambassador. I've just created the main forum for now, as conversation picks up, if we need specific sub-forums for devices etc. we can get those set up. Thanks for being here! :) P
  16. Hi all! I am looking at getting official TWRP support for the P9 (aka 'Eva') (as I have for the other Huawei / Honor devices. After creating a basic build tree, I have been spending countless hours reversing the decryption routines from the stock recovery and the good news is - I have a RC build online ready to try, complete with /data decryption! I will be submitting the files for official TWRP support shortly, but in the mean time you can check out the build below. Flash using 'fastboot flash recovery' and, of course, use at your own risk. DOWNLOAD - twrp-3.0.2-0-eva-modaco-rc1.img - MD5: f59edab048ca30feff78c67fad52c52e P
  17. So it's a bit rubbish that you can't use Amazon Video on your Kindle Fire if it's rooted. I don't want to steal movies, crack DRM or anything else, I just want to have a rooted device to use with my Amazon Prime VOD feature. Bit harsh imho. Sooooo.... I thought i'd have a poke around and see what I could find out. What I found was a very complex web of protection on a scale above anything i've seen an Android app before. Not only does the application check for root in more that one location (in the application itself and in the native library), it also performs tamper detection on the APK. Not only that but it also checks that the signature on the APK to check that no code has changed (if you change the code in classes.dex and drop it in, this is usually OK on a /system/app file, but not in this case). The code itself doesn't have a single, uniform tamper / root check function, it does it all over the place. Finally, just to make things even more difficult, key parts of the code are pretty heavily obfuscated to make the code hard to analyse / modify. Despite this, I thought i'd see what I could achieve by patching it piece by piece with the goal of allowing video with root. The first step was to work out how to get around the signature check. Without sorting this out, the app would immediately flag up as being tampered if I made ANY change to the code. The answer to this was to re-sign the Amazon Video APK, ATVAndroidClient.apk. Of course we don't have the Amazon certificates, so we can sign them with our own, or with SDK certificates. Since Amazon Video uses a shared user id, other APKs need to be signed too. The full list is ATVAndroidClient.apk, KindleForOtter.apk, OtterTutorial.apk, AmazonVenezia.apk, Launcher.apk, Windowshop.apk, CSApp-unsigned.apk, MyAccount-unsigned.apk, amazonmp3-unsigned.apk, Cloud9-unsigned.apk, OOBE-unsigned.apk, com.amazon.dcp.apk, Cloud9SystemBrowserProvider-unsigned.apk, OTASilentInstall.apk, Facebook.apk and OtterAppManager.apk. After doing this, the next step is to patch out the tamper checks. This can really only be achieved by tracing where the app goes and how it works and by carefully analysing logcat to get clues as to where the errors are happening. Since i'm in the UK I also had to use a DNS proxy with a static IP... I used unblock-us which works a treat. Eventually I got to a stage where I got the application to ignore any tamper detections, thereby enabling the various 'Watch' buttons. In the next step I could see what something was triggering another problem, and it turned out to be detection of root. This was happening in one of the more obfuscated bits of code, but again with careful tracing I managed to find this and patch it out. At this point the application was loading, passing tamper checks, giving me the watch buttons, requesting the stream from Amazon and giving me the loading progress bar etc... BUT... the licence request to Amazon continually failed. This is the point where I came to something of a brick wall. It appears that there is some additional root checking going on in the native library, and unfortunately, reverse engineering this is beyond both my abilities and more important the time I have available, so we don't have a fully working solution. :( The positive things though are that we now have a patchable Amazon Video APK, which means we can implement the functionality of the 'root keepers' within the app itself. We can effectively make the Amazon Video APK hide the su binary from itself on launch and put it back after it's run it's checks. Not ideal, but might be the best way to go. Note that the root check doesn't care about the Superuser APK, it only checks for 'su'. It checks in all the locations in the PATH variable, so moving it to, say. /system/root and adding that to the path won't help. Unfortunately. For now, I have to put this on the back burner, but i'm posting my patched APK below so that if anyone wants to pick up the work of reversing the native binary they can do so, simply by using this APK and re-signing it and the other APKs mentioned above. Any questions, feel free to ask them here. Obviously I have no interest in saving streams, downloading movies or any stupid stuff like that, so don't even ask. P DOWNLOAD (ROMraid) - MD5: f6044dbeffa4eb3f8361c71a96683150
  18. If so, then the device probably now has it's own forum area. :( P
  19. PaulOBrien

    Honor 8 EMUI 5 / Nougat beta test

    Good news Honor 8 owners! Honor are giving some of you the chance to help us test out EMUI 5 and Android N on your Honor 8. Sounds great yeah? Just remember this is going to be pre-release software, things may be broken, you may end up struggling to use your phone, but if that's all good they want you to help them find & squash the bugs. So what do you need to do to get the new stuff on your phone? It's easy - you install an app, enroll on the project and then towards the end of the month we will be pushing out the OTA to those that have had their applications approved. So what do you need? An Honor 8 (FRD-L09), which cannot be bootloader unlocked, it cannot have a custom recovery or be rooted to receive the OTA To be based in the UK. To have an active SIM card in your phone. To be on build number C432B131 You can get the APK for the BETA app & the guidelines for how to install and enroll here. Once downloaded, install it on your phone and when you run the app you will be prompted to either log into an existing Huawei ID account (the one you use to download EMUI themes will do) or to create a new one, once done you can accept the terms To enroll on the BETA test you will need to be on build number B131. An OTA to update UK Honor 8 from B120>B131 will be rolling out today, once you are on B131 you can enroll on the BETA test. Numbers are limited, when we hit the limit of enrolled users that is it. This is a project to help find bugs and issues before the general rollout of future updates for the Honor 8. It is not a general public rollout. We will be hosting discussions here in the forums to discuss bugs etc and to post details about future updates for the BETA. If you have problems either installing the APK, signing into Huawei ID or enrolling on the BETA please visit this topic for further assistance. View full item
  20. PaulOBrien

    Honor 8 EMUI 5 / Nougat beta test

    Sadly not! P
  21. PaulOBrien

    Honor 8 EMUI 5 / Nougat beta test

    Good news Honor 8 owners! Honor are giving some of you the chance to help us test out EMUI 5 and Android N on your Honor 8. Sounds great yeah? Just remember this is going to be pre-release software, things may be broken, you may end up struggling to use your phone, but if that's all good they want you to help them find & squash the bugs. So what do you need to do to get the new stuff on your phone? It's easy - you install an app, enroll on the project and then towards the end of the month we will be pushing out the OTA to those that have had their applications approved. So what do you need? An Honor 8 (FRD-L09), which cannot be bootloader unlocked, it cannot have a custom recovery or be rooted to receive the OTA To be based in the UK. To have an active SIM card in your phone. To be on build number C432B131 You can get the APK for the BETA app & the guidelines for how to install and enroll here. Once downloaded, install it on your phone and when you run the app you will be prompted to either log into an existing Huawei ID account (the one you use to download EMUI themes will do) or to create a new one, once done you can accept the terms To enroll on the BETA test you will need to be on build number B131. An OTA to update UK Honor 8 from B120>B131 will be rolling out today, once you are on B131 you can enroll on the BETA test. Numbers are limited, when we hit the limit of enrolled users that is it. This is a project to help find bugs and issues before the general rollout of future updates for the Honor 8. It is not a general public rollout. We will be hosting discussions here in the forums to discuss bugs etc and to post details about future updates for the BETA. If you have problems either installing the APK, signing into Huawei ID or enrolling on the BETA please visit this topic for further assistance.
  22. This is for the FRD-L09 model only. Full ROM packages: B101 EMUI 4.1 Android 6.0.1 (United Kingdom) - DOWNLOAD (ROMraid) - MD5: 63b8a82cd4af5360b5d34f9b2829059d To flash, extract the 'part1' file to a SD card as /dload then insert into a powered off device with plenty of battery and NO USB CABLE ATTACHED. Power on with both volume buttons held and allow the flash to complete. Repeat the process with the 'part2' directory afterwards.
  23. Curve, the virtual credit / debit card that has already launched on iOS has finally launched out of private Beta on Android and is downloadable now from the Play Store. After signing up to a free Curve card, you can assign your other cards to it and switch between them at will, paying via conventional means or using contactless payments. It works incredibly well and is a great way of keeping track of transactions etc. Purchase notifications are pushed to your phone instantly, email receipts can be switched on and receipt image capture, currently available on iOS, will be coming to the Android app in the future. There's no Android Pay support as yet, I really hope this comes at some point! The card itself (the entry level 'Blue' version) was previously paid for, but it is now free for a limited time. A 'Black' version is also available which will offer a higher cashback rate in the future as is a black version with an included card wallet. As well as the cards you load on the app, a built in reward card is included. This is empty on a normal signup, but if you sign up with the code 'TBXZH', you will then be credited with £5 the first time you use the card. For each friend you refer, you will get an additional £5. Pretty great really, who doesn't like free money? There are some useful value add features I've enjoyed in the time I've had the app on iOS, such as the ability to withdraw cash against credit cards with no fee (as the CC just sees it as a regular transaction) and the excellent foreign exchange rates. I used it abroad and got better rates than my Fair FX card! Head on over to the Play Store to download. [Note: This is targetting self employed and entrepreneurs right now. So determine how entrepreneurial you are!] View full item
  24. Curve, the virtual credit / debit card that has already launched on iOS has finally launched out of private Beta on Android and is downloadable now from the Play Store. After signing up to a free Curve card, you can assign your other cards to it and switch between them at will, paying via conventional means or using contactless payments. It works incredibly well and is a great way of keeping track of transactions etc. Purchase notifications are pushed to your phone instantly, email receipts can be switched on and receipt image capture, currently available on iOS, will be coming to the Android app in the future. There's no Android Pay support as yet, I really hope this comes at some point! The card itself (the entry level 'Blue' version) was previously paid for, but it is now free for a limited time. A 'Black' version is also available which will offer a higher cashback rate in the future as is a black version with an included card wallet. As well as the cards you load on the app, a built in reward card is included. This is empty on a normal signup, but if you sign up with the code 'TBXZH', you will then be credited with £5 the first time you use the card. For each friend you refer, you will get an additional £5. Pretty great really, who doesn't like free money? There are some useful value add features I've enjoyed in the time I've had the app on iOS, such as the ability to withdraw cash against credit cards with no fee (as the CC just sees it as a regular transaction) and the excellent foreign exchange rates. I used it abroad and got better rates than my Fair FX card! Head on over to the Play Store to download. [Note: This is targetting self employed and entrepreneurs right now. So determine how entrepreneurial you are!]
  25. Note: This guide is only tested on the Honor 5C B102 Marshmallow release Marshmallow on the Honor 5C is great, making a very nice device feel even better. But one thing missing is the option to 'adopt' microSD cards as Internal Storage, something that is particularly useful on the Honor 5C given its limited 16GB capacity. Fear not, you can do it manually! In order to set adopted storage up, you will need a computer with working 'adb' and, of course, a microSD card in your phone, the faster the better. Here's the process! 1. BACK UP THE DATA YOU HAVE ON YOUR MICROSD CARD. Your card will be formatted by this process, so make sure you have saved any pictures, videos etc. from your card to your PC before you start. 2. Decide how you want to split your card. You can either commit 100% of the card to internal storage, or split between internal storage and conventional SD. This option is useful if you like to unplug your card and put it in your PC. I would probably recommend committing the whole card. 3. Open your command window / terminal on your computer and type the 'adb shell' command (with your phone connected of course). You will need to enable USB debugging in developer settings (which in turn is displayed by tapping the build number of the device 5 times) in order to see the option. 4. Type 'sm list-disks' to list the disks available for adoption. It'll look something like below - take note of the disk ID (disk:179:160 in this example). 5. Partition the disk. For this we use the 'sm partition DISK TYPE RATIO' command. For example, to partition the disk above as fully adopted storage (aka private) I'd use the command 'sm partition disk:179:160 private'. If I wanted a 50/50 split between adopted and regular, I'd use the command 'sm partition disk:179:160 mixed 50'. Easy right? 6. This process will take a while, but when it's done, the Settings -> Additional Settings -> Storage view on your device should show the new Internal Storage. Note that, for some reason, the free space isn't reported correctly, however everything seems to work OK. When you install apps, they will generally install automatically to the adopted SD, although you can manually move things around if you want to, perhaps for performance reasons (the real Internal storage will likely always be a bit faster). 7. If you want to see how you are doing for space, you can use a third party tool such as FreeSpace or FreeSpace Plus. And that's it! Let us know how you get on, and enjoy your new, expanded Honor 5C! P
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