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Victor von Zeppelin

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About Victor von Zeppelin

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  • Birthday 03/02/1993

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  1. Great article Hecatae. Interesting stuff as well. Now I can see why you've been so into this recent low-end Qualcomm stuff :) One thing that strikes me - is MSM8225 basically the "LITTLE" chip that ARM announced as part of big.LITTLE? Because I haven't heard of the Cortex A5 before. Thought it had something to do with that family Ooootherwise. That MSM8227 is almost definitely going to be faster than any of the Snapdragon S3 chips.
  2. Two morsels of cheap Windows Phone goodness for you today. First is news of a ZTE Tania price drop. As seen on Clove, the Tania will be launching at £199.99 unlocked on 16th February. £200 is a very decent price for a 4.3in smartphone, considering it also packs a 1GHz CPU and a sizeable chunk of that fee also goes towards licencing Windows Phone from Microsoft. The Tania’s direct competition is from the Nokia Lumia 710 here in the UK, which is £250 unlocked, but £200 PAYG. However, what if you want to go even lower in price? A report from TechRadar suggests that we will be seeing a lower specced Lumia appearing at MWC. The device, the Lumia 610, will apparently feature Windows Phone Tango, an interim version that will increase hardware support, presumably to allow for lower end devices. Hence we may see the 610 with a smaller, low res screen, or maybe a slower, cheaper CPU. Either way, it seems we may know by the end of the month. Tania: Clove Lumia 610: TechRadar Click here to view the item
  3. An interesting story of unfair play has arisen from SkatterTech. In the US, Microsoft is holding a “Smoked by Windows Phone” challenge: where a Microsoft store employee races your phone against a Windows Phone. If you beat the Windows Phone in accessing a function with your phone, you stand to win a &#036;1000 laptop, and if you lose they give you a choice to trade in your phone for a WP7 device. <br /> <br /> However, what happened to Sahas Katta, a writer for SkatterTech wasn’t quite as clear-cut as that. In a test to see who could bring up information about the weather in two cities would win. Katta with his Galaxy Nexus couldn’t believe his luck, as he had previously disabled the lockscreen and had a couple of weather widgets set up on the homescreen. Once the test started Katta unlocked his phone and proclaimed himself the victor.<br /> <br /> Sadly the Windows store team took issue with his phone though, and when a manager was asked they made up a term about the Nexus not show the weather for two cities in different states.<br /> <br /> It seems like Microsoft may have been a bit too confident about the speed of Windows Phone, but it is a bit of a slimy move to disallow a winner from claiming is prize. It will be interesting to see how this unfolds. Microsoft has offered a rematch and an apology, but I doubt they’d enter him into a contest where the Nexus could win quite as easily. The MoDaCo team think Microsoft should relent and give him his prize.<br /> <br /> EDIT: Microsoft have issued an apology and given Katta both the laptop and a free phone. It&#39;s amazing what a bit of bad PR can do&#33;<br /> <br /> Read the whole story at SkatterTech<br /> <br /> Click here to view the item
  4. There’s no shortage of cloud storage options around these days – Dropbox, Skydrive, iCloud, Box, the newly released Google Drive and many many more. So what do we need? Of course, more choices! Step in LG Cloud, a cloud storage solution for Android, Desktops and Smart TVs by a company probably least popular for its handling of software. The service aims to be a one-stop shop for uploading files, media and photographs. However, its handling of video seems to be the biggest draw. With support for 3D and transcoding videos on demand (so, a film uploaded in 1080p could be streamed at a lower quality for your phone over 3G, for example) it seems that it offers value there at least. The service launched on Tuesday in Beta, if you're in the market such things it would also be worth looking at Sony’s new service which launched last Wednesday: PlayMemories – which I admit I hadn’t actually heard of until I started researching for this story. It offers many of the same features, plus integration with the PlayStations. There are still some details like the pricing of more storage to be clarified, as well as the base allowance to start with. I’m just a bit skeptical in LG’s ability to handle anything software-wise. Their recent track record hasn’t really been satisfactory. Source: LG Cloud This item was promoted to the News page - click here to view.
  5. There’s no shortage of cloud storage options around these days – Dropbox, Skydrive, iCloud, Box, the newly released Google Drive and many many more. So what do we need? Of course, more choices! Step in LG Cloud, a cloud storage solution for Android, Desktops and Smart TVs by a company probably least popular for its handling of software. The service aims to be a one-stop shop for uploading files, media and photographs. However, its handling of video seems to be the biggest draw. With support for 3D and transcoding videos on demand (so, a film uploaded in 1080p could be streamed at a lower quality for your phone over 3G, for example) it seems that it offers value there at least. The service launched on Tuesday in Beta, if you're in the market such things it would also be worth looking at Sony’s new service which launched last Wednesday: PlayMemories – which I admit I hadn’t actually heard of until I started researching for this story. It offers many of the same features, plus integration with the PlayStations. There are still some details like the pricing of more storage to be clarified, as well as the base allowance to start with. I’m just a bit skeptical in LG’s ability to handle anything software-wise. Their recent track record hasn’t really been satisfactory. Source: LG Cloud
  6. I don't know if it's entirely old, tbh. Tegra 3 is still on 40nm, positively old now compared to the Exynos. Only Intel have reached 22nm, I think.
  7. We pretty much know that Samsung’s May 3rd event will see the announcement of the Galaxy S3, but until then Samsung just can’t resist announcing things. The latest announcement comes in the form of the Exynos 4 Quad, aka the Exynos 4212. The biggest difference between the new chip and the one found in the Galaxy S II is that it’s, pretty obviously, a quad core part. Other features include it making use of a 32nm fabrication process, unlike the previous generation which used 40nm. This change should give better power efficiency to whilst allowing it to run faster and cooler. Samsung are also touting High-K Gate technology and dynamic voltage control, to further improve battery life. Otherwise, there’s not much new information here, but we’re glad to be given a spot of info when it comes to where we’ll find the chip – in the next Galaxy device. Samsung say: Source: Samsung Performance benchmarks that have leaked through Antutu and such make the Exynos look incredibly powerful. It'll be interesting to finally see how it stacks up against the Snapdragon S4 and the Tegra 3. This item was promoted to the News page - click here to view.
  8. We pretty much know that Samsung’s May 3rd event will see the announcement of the Galaxy S3, but until then Samsung just can’t resist announcing things. The latest announcement comes in the form of the Exynos 4 Quad, aka the Exynos 4212. The biggest difference between the new chip and the one found in the Galaxy S II is that it’s, pretty obviously, a quad core part. Other features include it making use of a 32nm fabrication process, unlike the previous generation which used 40nm. This change should give better power efficiency to whilst allowing it to run faster and cooler. Samsung are also touting High-K Gate technology and dynamic voltage control, to further improve battery life. Otherwise, there’s not much new information here, but we’re glad to be given a spot of info when it comes to where we’ll find the chip – in the next Galaxy device. Samsung say: Source: Samsung Performance benchmarks that have leaked through Antutu and such make the Exynos look incredibly powerful. It'll be interesting to finally see how it stacks up against the Snapdragon S4 and the Tegra 3.
  9. Techradar have a story about Samsung’s schedule around the launch of the Galaxy S3. From the sounds of it, we probably won’t have to wait too long after the announcement to get our hands on the device. A choice quote from the article: It seems pretty clear that Samsung intend for their new device announced on May 3rd (and we still haven't heard definitive word that it'll be called the S3) to be available soon after. Samsung must feel it's pretty necessary to keep the tremendous buzz it's generating by following up with supplies of the phone quickly. Source: Techradar This item was promoted to the News page - click here to view.
  10. Techradar have a story about Samsung’s schedule around the launch of the Galaxy S3. From the sounds of it, we probably won’t have to wait too long after the announcement to get our hands on the device. A choice quote from the article: It seems pretty clear that Samsung intend for their new device announced on May 3rd (and we still haven't heard definitive word that it'll be called the S3) to be available soon after. Samsung must feel it's pretty necessary to keep the tremendous buzz it's generating by following up with supplies of the phone quickly. Source: Techradar
  11. The Lava Xolo X900, the first of many devices based on Intel’s Medfield reference platform is out in India and has promptly been reviewed by the fantastic guys over at AnandTech. Many of you may not have heard of the Xolo and may wonder why it’s important to us outside of India. The answer is that it’s part of Intel’s method of quickly getting devices out to consumers - instead of selling their chip alone to your usual Motorolas and such, Intel are releasing the reference device to consumers. India got it as the Xolo, and here in the UK we’ll be seeing it as the Orange Santa Clara. This means that the review from Anandtech will be of the device Orange will eventually sell, albeit under a different name. As hinted, the biggest draw of the phone is that it’s powered by an Intel CPU. The Medfield chip contains a 1.6GHz single core Atom and a PowerVR SGX 540 GPU (similar to the GPU in the Galaxy Nexus, but clocked higher). The high clock speed and powerful x86 architecture allows the phone to power through browser benchmarks, but the single core wasn’t quite enough to beat out the Tegra 3 and Snapdragon S4 in most other tests. Overall the device was speedy, but it looks set to have a lot of trouble against next generation of ARM chips. Find the whole review on Anandtech, it’s a highly informative read!
  12. The Lava Xolo X900, the first of many devices based on Intel’s Medfield reference platform is out in India and has promptly been reviewed by the fantastic guys over at AnandTech. Many of you may not have heard of the Xolo and may wonder why it’s important to us outside of India. The answer is that it’s part of Intel’s method of quickly getting devices out to consumers - instead of selling their chip alone to your usual Motorolas and such, Intel are releasing the reference device to consumers. India got it as the Xolo, and here in the UK we’ll be seeing it as the Orange Santa Clara. This means that the review from Anandtech will be of the device Orange will eventually sell, albeit under a different name. As hinted, the biggest draw of the phone is that it’s powered by an Intel CPU. The Medfield chip contains a 1.6GHz single core Atom and a PowerVR SGX 540 GPU (similar to the GPU in the Galaxy Nexus, but clocked higher). The high clock speed and powerful x86 architecture allows the phone to power through browser benchmarks, but the single core wasn’t quite enough to beat out the Tegra 3 and Snapdragon S4 in most other tests. Overall the device was speedy, but it looks set to have a lot of trouble against next generation of ARM chips. Find the whole review on Anandtech, it’s a highly informative read!
  13. Google have finally made Drive official – their own long awaited competitor in the Cloud Storage arena. Google Drive follows the template of many of its competitors, such as Box and Dropbox. Indeed, it’s so similar that, upon installing the desktop app, you’re given a drop box-style folder. With it you’re given 5GB of free cloud storage that syncs between your PC, Mac, Android and soon, iOS devices.<br /> <br /> A big draw of Drive is that it is combined with Google Docs. All of your stored Docs now appear when you run one of the Drive apps, and uploaded files are quickly visible in the web interface. It generally seems a quicker way to access your files than having to upload and download them manually.<br /> <br /> There are some places where Drive doesn&#39;t quite live up to its competitors, though. I do think some of these features will come as the software matures, but at the moment it’s a little behind. For example, Dropbox Pro offers a form of versioning called PackRat, which lets you dig through old versions of files to recover lost data. Another thing I really miss is being able to right click a file in Dropbox on my desktop and getting the public link to share with the world. I’ve yet to find similar capabilities in Drive (of course, sharing with other Drive users is super easy, but you have to do it from the web app).<br /> <br /> This may sound a lot like stealing ideas from Dropbox, but they’re plainly doing it best at the moment. While Google don&#39;t need a referral scheme to build their user base it was one of the big attracting factors for Dropbox originally and can net you much more than the initial free allocation.<br /> <br /> Some of you may think that 5GB doesn’t feel like enough space. Luckily, Google offers extra space for a small amount each month. Prices are currently only given in US Dollars at the moment, but an extra 25 GB for &#036;2.49 (~£1.54) and 100GB for &#036;4.99 (~£3.09) seem reasonable. Also included is a pretty huge 1TB, for &#036;49.99 (~£30.90) per month. Buying any of these packages increases your Gmail storage to 25 GB.<br /> <br /> Google drive is available to everyone now. The desktop sync apps are available for Mac and PC, whilst the new Android app basically replaces the old Google Docs App. The instant integration with Android and desktop sync software has allowed Drive to become the biggest threat to Dropbox in the blink of an eye. It will be interesting to see if the gap between the two solutions closes, or if Dropbox is ready to put on its innovation shoes and beat Google.<br /> <br /> Find more here: Google Drive<br /> <br /> Also announced was the Google Drive SDK, which allows easy integration for apps into the new service. More HERE<div style='text-align: center;'><img src='a44620dcb3a16c6c3996cdf8e4230307.jpg' alt='' /></div><div style='text-align: center;'><img src='' alt='' /></div><br /> <br /> This item was promoted to the News page - click here to view.
  14. Google have finally made Drive official – their own long awaited competitor in the Cloud Storage arena. Google Drive follows the template of many of its competitors, such as Box and Dropbox. Indeed, it’s so similar that, upon installing the desktop app, you’re given a drop box-style folder. With it you’re given 5GB of free cloud storage that syncs between your PC, Mac, Android and soon, iOS devices. A big draw of Drive is that it is combined with Google Docs. All of your stored Docs now appear when you run one of the Drive apps, and uploaded files are quickly visible in the web interface. It generally seems a quicker way to access your files than having to upload and download them manually. There are some places where Drive doesn't quite live up to its competitors, though. I do think some of these features will come as the software matures, but at the moment it’s a little behind. For example, Dropbox Pro offers a form of versioning called PackRat, which lets you dig through old versions of files to recover lost data. Another thing I really miss is being able to right click a file in Dropbox on my desktop and getting the public link to share with the world. I’ve yet to find similar capabilities in Drive (of course, sharing with other Drive users is super easy, but you have to do it from the web app). This may sound a lot like stealing ideas from Dropbox, but they’re plainly doing it best at the moment. While Google don't need a referral scheme to build their user base it was one of the big attracting factors for Dropbox originally and can net you much more than the initial free allocation. Some of you may think that 5GB doesn’t feel like enough space. Luckily, Google offers extra space for a small amount each month. Prices are currently only given in US Dollars at the moment, but an extra 25 GB for $2.49 (~£1.54) and 100GB for $4.99 (~£3.09) seem reasonable. Also included is a pretty huge 1TB, for $49.99 (~£30.90) per month. Buying any of these packages increases your Gmail storage to 25 GB. Google drive is available to everyone now. The desktop sync apps are available for Mac and PC, whilst the new Android app basically replaces the old Google Docs App. The instant integration with Android and desktop sync software has allowed Drive to become the biggest threat to Dropbox in the blink of an eye. It will be interesting to see if the gap between the two solutions closes, or if Dropbox is ready to put on its innovation shoes and beat Google. Find more here: Google Drive Also announced was the Google Drive SDK, which allows easy integration for apps into the new service. More HERE
  15. The Xperia P, Sony’s middle child in its NXT line up has started appearing for pre-order. It can be found in a Sim-free form at some online retailers, who are offering the device at prices ranging from £315 (at Unlocked-mobiles.com) to £380 (at places like Play.com). It’s pretty obvious where I’d go to get one&#33; A date of 7th May is being thrown around at the moment, which seems like a realistic launch time.<br /> <br /> The Xperia P seems like a solid mid-range device. Headline specs include its 4inch qHD display that features “WhiteMagic” (Yes, I know, it’s an awful name) technology, which in essence adds a forth, white subpixel next to the usual triad of Red, Green and Blue. This will mean it features twice the subpixels of the much maligned Pentile arrangement and should keep screen enthusiasts pleased, especially with its 275 dpi resolution.<br /> <br /> Other features include ST-Ericsson’s NovaThor U8500 CPU – a fairly new entrant to the SoC arena, but should compete well. It features a Dual Core 1Ghz CPU, and an Adreno 205 GPU. It sounds like a decent performer, but not anything revolutionary. The design of the device is very much reminiscent of the Xperia S, as one would expect.<br /> <br /> It seems like this phone is trying to meet an interesting half way point between HTC’s One S and One V. Whilst vastly less expensive than the One S, the screen should be far superior, but the device will be hampered by a slower SoC. Versus the One V, the Xperia P will be much faster and have a better screen, but will be a tad more expensive and possibly have a slightly lower build quality.<br /> <br /> Finally, it should be noted that the Xperia P only ships with Android 2.3, but an ICS update should appear very shortly afterwards.<br /> <br /> You can pre-order the Xperia P from many places. Unlocked-Mobiles seem to be doing it cheapest. Via: HotUKDeals<br /> <br /> Update: Some news from Clove suggests that Xperia P will be launching instead on the 28th May. They say news comes from Sony, so it should be reliable. Also mentioned is the lowest end device of the line, the Xperia U, which will launch at the same time. Source: Clove<br /> <br /> Find the whole spec sheet in the white paper here: Sony<div style='text-align: center;'><img src='a0f2a4e8f1a8dfd46bbd6ce3663ebef5.jpg' alt='' /></div><div style='text-align: center;'><img src='' alt='' /></div><br /> <br /> This item was promoted to the News page - click here to view.
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