Jump to content

Wifi in the home...


Guest nforsans

Recommended Posts

Guest nforsans

First, apologies if this is not the right place to post such a naff question: I have been using pocketpcs for a long time, but I am new to wireless networks.

Here's the naff question: I have a laptop (main PC) at home, an internet connection (via cable modem) using an ethernet cable linking the modem to the laptop. Fine. Now, I want to do two things. Using my vario and Vario II, I want to access my home internet connection and to do that I need to setup a Wireless network. Fine. Now I also want to be able to move my laptop around the flat and still enjoy my internet connection.

I have bought a Netgear Wireless router 54 Mps and I connected it all right to the cable modem. i created my own network. Everything is fine. Using my vario's Connection manager, I can connect easily to my wireless network and therefore use my home cable internet connection when I move with my Vario around the house.

But, there is a problem: The Netgear stuff links my cable modem to my laptop (using an ethernet cable), as I do not have any other PC in the flat. Which means I can not move around the flat with my laptop and watch a movie in say, the kitchen. In other words, I am not enjoying wireless internet on the laptop.

I thought going for a wireless router would enable me to get rid off the ethernet cable that provides my laptop with an internet connection. I must add that I have a wireless card plugged into the laptop (although it is not switched on) and I thought the laptop would get an internet connection via the wireless card which would have communicated wirelessly with the router, itself linked to the cable modem. See what I mean?

Apoologies if it is a stupid question. Have I bought the wrong kind of netgear device? Is there a way I can have wireless internet on the laptop using the wireless card and a router?

Thanks for any advice / thoughts you may have.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest jimbouk

You say you have a wireless card in your laptop but its turned off. You don't need to have a pc/laptop connected to your router or modem by cable. Once the cable modem is set up, it will stay connected (and reconnect if it resumes from a power off). Similarly the netgear wireless router should be able to be set up once and then...

Turn the wireless card on in the laptop. Connect it to the wireless router and your laptop should enjoy the same connectivity as the Vario!

Issues:

1) Is the wireless card in your laptop wireless B or G. If its B make sure the netgear is in "mixed" mode and thus offers both B and G as your Vario is G.

2) Wifi Security. If you have WEP or WPA on, then your laptop will need the key entered - usually in the same way as your Vario (although it will want it twice). Some cards and routers don't have the same level of security - so check with the manufacturers site if you have any issues.

3) DHCP - the netgear router may need a specific setting to act as the dhcp server on your network (although if the vario is working then the laptop should too.

Anyway, give it a try and if it doesn't work let us know.

Edited by jimbouk
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest eaglesrest
First, apologies if this is not the right place to post such a naff question: I have been using pocketpcs for a long time, but I am new to wireless networks.

Here's the naff question: I have a laptop (main PC) at home, an internet connection (via cable modem) using an ethernet cable linking the modem to the laptop. Fine. Now, I want to do two things. Using my vario and Vario II, I want to access my home internet connection and to do that I need to setup a Wireless network. Fine. Now I also want to be able to move my laptop around the flat and still enjoy my internet connection.

I have bought a Netgear Wireless router 54 Mps and I connected it all right to the cable modem. i created my own network. Everything is fine. Using my vario's Connection manager, I can connect easily to my wireless network and therefore use my home cable internet connection when I move with my Vario around the house.

But, there is a problem: The Netgear stuff links my cable modem to my laptop (using an ethernet cable), as I do not have any other PC in the flat. Which means I can not move around the flat with my laptop and watch a movie in say, the kitchen. In other words, I am not enjoying wireless internet on the laptop.

I thought going for a wireless router would enable me to get rid off the ethernet cable that provides my laptop with an internet connection. I must add that I have a wireless card plugged into the laptop (although it is not switched on) and I thought the laptop would get an internet connection via the wireless card which would have communicated wirelessly with the router, itself linked to the cable modem. See what I mean?

Apoologies if it is a stupid question. Have I bought the wrong kind of netgear device? Is there a way I can have wireless internet on the laptop using the wireless card and a router?

Thanks for any advice / thoughts you may have.

you have 2 choices. see if the ethernet modem can be directly connected to your wireless router or, and preferable buy an adsl router e.g. wpnt511 rangemax 240 mbps. stay away from the draft n stuff its pants.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest nforsans
you have 2 choices. see if the ethernet modem can be directly connected to your wireless router or, and preferable buy an adsl router e.g. wpnt511 rangemax 240 mbps. stay away from the draft n stuff its pants.

Thanks both - I have unplugged the ethernet cable between the router and the laptop and switched the wireless card on on the laptop and... it seems to work fine: I can connect to my network fine.

Thanks again

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest jimbouk

Now you really should add security to your wireless lan.

The minimum is WEP - where you select 128bit encryption and enter a key into your router (over its web interface control) and then on your device.

Slightly better is WPA - where you enter a key also.

Third option is mac filtering - where you tell your router to only allow access to the machines already accessing it.

I would do Mac filtering and WPA if I were you. But set them up with your laptop also connected to router by ethernet - as some routers kick off wifi clients as you turn security on.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest nforsans
Now you really should add security to your wireless lan.

The minimum is WEP - where you select 128bit encryption and enter a key into your router (over its web interface control) and then on your device.

Slightly better is WPA - where you enter a key also.

Third option is mac filtering - where you tell your router to only allow access to the machines already accessing it.

I would do Mac filtering and WPA if I were you. But set them up with your laptop also connected to router by ethernet - as some routers kick off wifi clients as you turn security on.

Thanks -will do it now.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

yep definately have security ASAP

i can pick up 6 networks now when i scan and 3 are unsecured i found this out initially as i had the wifi hardware for my desktop but no internet till 3 days later yet it automatically connected to the first open point and this is without me trying to get in or anything.

my girlfriends laptop often just connects to the first open network as well without her being involved if she just puts wifi on in town. dont want people connecting to mine without me allowing them so ...

Ive got WPA-PSK and MAC filtering on that should be pretty secure really but everything i have desktop and router is capable of WPA2-PSK but the Vario II isnt otherwise id have used that

JEREMY

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest jimbouk

The two main reasons for wifi security are 1) unauthorised access/use...you don't want sickos or terrorists using your IP address for their nefarious activities (until the Feds come knocking at your door) and 2) someone intercepting your network traffic and being able to see your banking login details etc.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest AdWright
The two main reasons for wifi security are 1) unauthorised access/use...you don't want sickos or terrorists using your IP address for their nefarious activities (until the Feds come knocking at your door) and 2) someone intercepting your network traffic and being able to see your banking login details etc.

And probably more likely than either of those, the kiddies next door stealing your bandwidth for downloading!

Edited by AdWright
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest jimbouk

Well if you are on a broadband account with a monthly limit, you dont want to find out that your neighbour has used it all (downloading hookey dvd's) - or simply that your speed is sorely reduced as your neighbour is sending 18000 spam emails a day from your ip address.

I would be most worried that my IP address was linked to illegal activities and that Big Brother would be watching me.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest nforsans

Thanks for your input. One thing I wonder about is why would you put some security (WEP, etc.) onto the wifi as I can configure my router in such a way that I can only share the connection with approved devices (entered by MAC address)? I suppose it means someone on the street who is using his/her own device will not be able to connect to my network, whatever the level of security. Am I wrong?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

MAC filtering only while a good start should not be used alone as your primary source of security. as a MAC address can be spooffed or copied and then anyone with the inclination to can then connect to your network your the copied MAC address. this could also mean that if someone is connected on your network and has spoofed YOUR MAC address even you might not be able to connect to your own network!

hence security is needed. at the least WEP with MAC filtering but better is WPA PSK with MAC filtering

its quite easy to set really so no reason why you shouldn't have it

Jeremy

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest jimbouk

Wep and/or WPA don't slow down the network, they are dead simple to set up (on Windows XP SP2 laptops and pc's onwards and on WM5 and WM2003se devices) and it does add an important level of defence against your data being read by others.

And if you are concerned, and use one of the wifi manufacturers built in WEP Key generator, don't use your SSID, your surname or house name to generate the key. Something like 75% of wep keys can be guessed as they use one of the Belkin/Netgear/Linksys generator algorhythms and are simply generated from one of the above.

Edited by jimbouk
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest nforsans
Wep and/or WPA don't slow down the network, they are dead simple to set up (on Windows XP SP2 laptops and pc's onwards and on WM5 and WM2003se devices) and it does add an important level of defence against your data being read by others.

And if you are concerned, and use one of the wifi manufacturers built in WEP Key generator, don't use your SSID, your surname or house name to generate the key. Something like 75% of wep keys can be guessed as they use one of the Belkin/Netgear/Linksys generator algorhythms and are simply generated from one of the above.

I've set it up and it works fine. Thanks for answering my (stupid) questions..!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Please sign in to comment

You will be able to leave a comment after signing in



Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.